Objectives: The association of body fat with health status and depression in the oldest old is still debated. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the association of body fat with health-related quality of life and depression in a sample of nonagenarians. Design: Data are from the Mugello study, a community-based project conducted in Italian older adults aged 90 years. Setting and participants: Total body fat was assessed by body impedance assessment. Participants were divided into 3 groups according to gender-specific tertiles of body fat percentage (BF%). Self-perceived mental and physical health status were assessed by the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS) subscales derived from the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. Lower scores of MCS and PCS indicated poorer mental health and physical health status, respectively. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and a score ≥5 was used to identify participants with depression. Results: The mean age of 251 study participants was 92.5 years, and 173 (68.9%) were women. Participants were included in the low (n = 83), medium (n = 83), and high (n = 85) BF% groups. In the whole sample, mean scores at PCS progressively declined with the increasing BF% group (P =.004). This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between the gender and BF% group (P =.63). No significant association between BF% and MCS was documented. Medium and high BF% were associated with a significantly higher probability of depression as compared with low BF% [odds ratio (OR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-4.44, and OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.06-4.34, respectively]. This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between gender and BF% group (P =.70). Conclusions and implications: High BF% is significantly positively associated with poor health-related quality of life and depression, underpinning the clinical relevance to test BF% in older adults. These associations appear to be stronger in women than in men, highlighting the need to investigate deep inside this gender discrepancy.

Objectives: The association of body fat with health status and depression in the oldest old is still debated. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the association of body fat with health-related quality of life and depression in a sample of nonagenarians. Design: Data are from the Mugello study, a community-based project conducted in Italian older adults aged 90 years. Setting and participants: Total body fat was assessed by body impedance assessment. Participants were divided into 3 groups according to gender-specific tertiles of body fat percentage (BF%). Self-perceived mental and physical health status were assessed by the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS) subscales derived from the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. Lower scores of MCS and PCS indicated poorer mental health and physical health status, respectively. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and a score ≥5 was used to identify participants with depression. Results: The mean age of 251 study participants was 92.5 years, and 173 (68.9%) were women. Participants were included in the low (n = 83), medium (n = 83), and high (n = 85) BF% groups. In the whole sample, mean scores at PCS progressively declined with the increasing BF% group (P =.004). This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between the gender and BF% group (P =.63). No significant association between BF% and MCS was documented. Medium and high BF% were associated with a significantly higher probability of depression as compared with low BF% [odds ratio (OR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-4.44, and OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.06-4.34, respectively]. This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between gender and BF% group (P =.70). Conclusions and implications: High BF% is significantly positively associated with poor health-related quality of life and depression, underpinning the clinical relevance to test BF% in older adults. These associations appear to be stronger in women than in men, highlighting the need to investigate deep inside this gender discrepancy.

Association of Body Fat With Health-Related Quality of Life and Depression in Nonagenarians: The Mugello Study / Giovannini, Silvia*; Macchi, Claudio; Liperoti, Rossella; Laudisio, Alice; Coraci, Daniele; Loreti, Claudia; Vannetti, Federica; Onder, Graziano; Padua, Luca; Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo; Boni, Roberta; CastagnolI, Chiara; Cecchi, Francesca; Cesari, Francesca; Epifani, Francesco; Frandi, Roberta; Giusti, Betti; Luisi, Maria Luisa Eliana; Marcucci, Rossella; Molino-Lova, Raffaello; Paperini, Anita; Razzolini, Lorenzo; Sofi, Francesco; Turcan, Nona; Valecchi, Debora. - In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION. - ISSN 1525-8610. - STAMPA. - 20:5(2019), pp. 564-568. [10.1016/j.jamda.2019.01.128]

Association of Body Fat With Health-Related Quality of Life and Depression in Nonagenarians: The Mugello Study

Macchi, Claudio;Vannetti, Federica;Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo;Cecchi, Francesca;Giusti, Betti;Marcucci, Rossella;Sofi, Francesco;
2019

Abstract

Objectives: The association of body fat with health status and depression in the oldest old is still debated. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the association of body fat with health-related quality of life and depression in a sample of nonagenarians. Design: Data are from the Mugello study, a community-based project conducted in Italian older adults aged 90 years. Setting and participants: Total body fat was assessed by body impedance assessment. Participants were divided into 3 groups according to gender-specific tertiles of body fat percentage (BF%). Self-perceived mental and physical health status were assessed by the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS) subscales derived from the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. Lower scores of MCS and PCS indicated poorer mental health and physical health status, respectively. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and a score ≥5 was used to identify participants with depression. Results: The mean age of 251 study participants was 92.5 years, and 173 (68.9%) were women. Participants were included in the low (n = 83), medium (n = 83), and high (n = 85) BF% groups. In the whole sample, mean scores at PCS progressively declined with the increasing BF% group (P =.004). This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between the gender and BF% group (P =.63). No significant association between BF% and MCS was documented. Medium and high BF% were associated with a significantly higher probability of depression as compared with low BF% [odds ratio (OR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-4.44, and OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.06-4.34, respectively]. This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between gender and BF% group (P =.70). Conclusions and implications: High BF% is significantly positively associated with poor health-related quality of life and depression, underpinning the clinical relevance to test BF% in older adults. These associations appear to be stronger in women than in men, highlighting the need to investigate deep inside this gender discrepancy.
2019
20
564
568
Goal 3: Good health and well-being for people
Objectives: The association of body fat with health status and depression in the oldest old is still debated. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the association of body fat with health-related quality of life and depression in a sample of nonagenarians. Design: Data are from the Mugello study, a community-based project conducted in Italian older adults aged 90 years. Setting and participants: Total body fat was assessed by body impedance assessment. Participants were divided into 3 groups according to gender-specific tertiles of body fat percentage (BF%). Self-perceived mental and physical health status were assessed by the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS) subscales derived from the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. Lower scores of MCS and PCS indicated poorer mental health and physical health status, respectively. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and a score ≥5 was used to identify participants with depression. Results: The mean age of 251 study participants was 92.5 years, and 173 (68.9%) were women. Participants were included in the low (n = 83), medium (n = 83), and high (n = 85) BF% groups. In the whole sample, mean scores at PCS progressively declined with the increasing BF% group (P =.004). This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between the gender and BF% group (P =.63). No significant association between BF% and MCS was documented. Medium and high BF% were associated with a significantly higher probability of depression as compared with low BF% [odds ratio (OR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-4.44, and OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.06-4.34, respectively]. This association was stronger in women, although no significant interaction was observed between gender and BF% group (P =.70). Conclusions and implications: High BF% is significantly positively associated with poor health-related quality of life and depression, underpinning the clinical relevance to test BF% in older adults. These associations appear to be stronger in women than in men, highlighting the need to investigate deep inside this gender discrepancy.
Giovannini, Silvia*; Macchi, Claudio; Liperoti, Rossella; Laudisio, Alice; Coraci, Daniele; Loreti, Claudia; Vannetti, Federica; Onder, Graziano; Padua, Luca; Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo; Boni, Roberta; CastagnolI, Chiara; Cecchi, Francesca; Cesari, Francesca; Epifani, Francesco; Frandi, Roberta; Giusti, Betti; Luisi, Maria Luisa Eliana; Marcucci, Rossella; Molino-Lova, Raffaello; Paperini, Anita; Razzolini, Lorenzo; Sofi, Francesco; Turcan, Nona; Valecchi, Debora
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1150744
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