The traditional plan has failed in defining ambitious visions through large projects, which – in the changed economic situation and as a result of a sharp decline in public investment – remained on paper. In this gloomy picture, tactical urbanism calls for greater participation of citizens and urban activists and for the ability of institutions to pay attention to these initiatives. The basic condition is definitely the small scale of actions and the achievement of consensus on these practices, often subversive. Consensus is fostered by new communication technologies, which ensure the dissemination and monitoring of good practices, and inspire citizens and civic leaders in the re-configuration of urban spaces in view of the realisation of long-term projects. However, a process of "recognition" and sharing the value of these practices by communities and institutions should occur in order to avoid that these limited practices will not be able to reverberate their long-term effects. When this recognition happens, tactics lose their impromptu character to become part of a broader strategy and/or formal government acts (agreements, protocols, if not formal requirements into statutory planning, aimed to replicate actions). Compared to the military and sociological dichotomy conceiving tactics as subversive practices of a set of given norms, nowadays the need for a cooperative relationship between citizens and institutions emerge, in order to insert tactics in a broader framework and disseminate and amplify their results until they develop long-term effects. This prefiguring capacity implies the transition from tactic to strategy, as well as the overcoming of the opposition between individual and institutional action, to act on the ability of both to shape the future. This is not intended as a passing of one in favour of the other, but as a mutual contamination between scales (from micro to macro and vice versa) and between policies (from short to long term, and vice versa). If tactics are referred to the impromptu redesign and management of public space, with short-term effects, institutions’ systematisation of these prototype projects into long-term strategies is crucial for the transition from a temporary and localised vision, linked to a specific (public) space, to a set of actions that are part of a broader vision concerning the whole city. In this process of scaling up, the definition of a vision through Regional Design tools and methods can represent the condition for promoting the mutual contamination between strategical and tactical planning frameworks, including short-term interventions and long-term policies.

Dalle tattiche alle strategie e ritorno: pratiche di contaminazione nel Regional Design / Lingua,. - In: URBANISTICA. - ISSN 0042-1022. - STAMPA. - 157:(2017), pp. 55-60.

Dalle tattiche alle strategie e ritorno: pratiche di contaminazione nel Regional Design

lingua
2017

Abstract

The traditional plan has failed in defining ambitious visions through large projects, which – in the changed economic situation and as a result of a sharp decline in public investment – remained on paper. In this gloomy picture, tactical urbanism calls for greater participation of citizens and urban activists and for the ability of institutions to pay attention to these initiatives. The basic condition is definitely the small scale of actions and the achievement of consensus on these practices, often subversive. Consensus is fostered by new communication technologies, which ensure the dissemination and monitoring of good practices, and inspire citizens and civic leaders in the re-configuration of urban spaces in view of the realisation of long-term projects. However, a process of "recognition" and sharing the value of these practices by communities and institutions should occur in order to avoid that these limited practices will not be able to reverberate their long-term effects. When this recognition happens, tactics lose their impromptu character to become part of a broader strategy and/or formal government acts (agreements, protocols, if not formal requirements into statutory planning, aimed to replicate actions). Compared to the military and sociological dichotomy conceiving tactics as subversive practices of a set of given norms, nowadays the need for a cooperative relationship between citizens and institutions emerge, in order to insert tactics in a broader framework and disseminate and amplify their results until they develop long-term effects. This prefiguring capacity implies the transition from tactic to strategy, as well as the overcoming of the opposition between individual and institutional action, to act on the ability of both to shape the future. This is not intended as a passing of one in favour of the other, but as a mutual contamination between scales (from micro to macro and vice versa) and between policies (from short to long term, and vice versa). If tactics are referred to the impromptu redesign and management of public space, with short-term effects, institutions’ systematisation of these prototype projects into long-term strategies is crucial for the transition from a temporary and localised vision, linked to a specific (public) space, to a set of actions that are part of a broader vision concerning the whole city. In this process of scaling up, the definition of a vision through Regional Design tools and methods can represent the condition for promoting the mutual contamination between strategical and tactical planning frameworks, including short-term interventions and long-term policies.
157
55
60
Lingua,
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1106743
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