PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term effects of the fractional CO2 laser for the treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) symptoms. METHODS: Women presenting with VVA symptoms and meeting inclusion criterion were enrolled to fractioned CO2 laser therapy. Patient's satisfaction was measured on five-point Likert scale at 4 weeks and 6, 12, 18, 24 months after treatment by interview and clinical examination for vaginal livability. RESULTS: 184 patients constituted the final study group: 128 women were spontaneous menopause and 56 were oncological menopause. 117 women were nulliparous and 36 had previous hysterectomy. 95.4% (172/184) of the patients declared that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure at 4 weeks after treatment. At 6 months 92% (170/184) patients were satisfied; at 12 months 72% (118/162) were satisfied; at 18 months 63% (60/94) were satisfied; at 24 months 25% (4/16) of patients answered they were still satisfied. We observed a decline in patient's satisfaction between 18 and 24 months after laser therapy. Data showed that the time interval from onset of menopause was a statistically significant factor (p < 0.05) for treatment satisfaction in oncological group. CONCLUSION: Long-term data showed that the improvement of vaginal health may continue up to 24 months after fractional CO2 laser treatment although between 18 and 24 months benefits decline, and approximately 80% of women decide to start a new treatment cycle of laser applications.

Long-term reliability of fractioned CO2 laser as a treatment for vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) symptoms / Pieralli, Annalisa*; Bianchi, Claudia; Longinotti, Manuela; Corioni, Serena; Auzzi, Noemi; Becorpi, Angelamaria; Fallani, Maria Grazia; Cariti, Giuseppe; Petraglia, Felice. - In: ARCHIVES OF GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS. - ISSN 0932-0067. - ELETTRONICO. - 296:(2017), pp. 973-978. [10.1007/s00404-017-4504-8]

Long-term reliability of fractioned CO2 laser as a treatment for vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) symptoms

Pieralli, Annalisa;Bianchi, Claudia;LONGINOTTI, MANUELA;Corioni, Serena;AUZZI, NOEMI;Fallani, Maria Grazia;Cariti, Giuseppe;Petraglia, Felice
2017

Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term effects of the fractional CO2 laser for the treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) symptoms. METHODS: Women presenting with VVA symptoms and meeting inclusion criterion were enrolled to fractioned CO2 laser therapy. Patient's satisfaction was measured on five-point Likert scale at 4 weeks and 6, 12, 18, 24 months after treatment by interview and clinical examination for vaginal livability. RESULTS: 184 patients constituted the final study group: 128 women were spontaneous menopause and 56 were oncological menopause. 117 women were nulliparous and 36 had previous hysterectomy. 95.4% (172/184) of the patients declared that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure at 4 weeks after treatment. At 6 months 92% (170/184) patients were satisfied; at 12 months 72% (118/162) were satisfied; at 18 months 63% (60/94) were satisfied; at 24 months 25% (4/16) of patients answered they were still satisfied. We observed a decline in patient's satisfaction between 18 and 24 months after laser therapy. Data showed that the time interval from onset of menopause was a statistically significant factor (p < 0.05) for treatment satisfaction in oncological group. CONCLUSION: Long-term data showed that the improvement of vaginal health may continue up to 24 months after fractional CO2 laser treatment although between 18 and 24 months benefits decline, and approximately 80% of women decide to start a new treatment cycle of laser applications.
2017
296
973
978
Pieralli, Annalisa*; Bianchi, Claudia; Longinotti, Manuela; Corioni, Serena; Auzzi, Noemi; Becorpi, Angelamaria; Fallani, Maria Grazia; Cariti, Giuseppe; Petraglia, Felice
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1113558
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