Wound healing is a very complex process that allows organisms to survive injuries. It is strictly regulated by a number of biochemical and physical factors, mechanical forces included. Studying wound healing in space is interesting for two main reasons: (i) defining tools, procedures, and protocols to manage serious wounds and burns eventually occurring in future long-lasting space exploration missions, without the possibility of timely medical evacuation to Earth; (ii) understanding the role of gravity and mechanical factors in the healing process and scarring, thus contributing to unravelling the mechanisms underlying the switching between perfect regeneration and imperfect repair with scarring. In the study presented here, a new in vivo sutured wound healing model in the leech (Hirudo medicinalis) has been used to evaluate the effect of unloading conditions on the healing process and the effectiveness of platelet rich plasma (PRP) as a countermeasure. The results reveal that microgravity caused a healing delay and structural alterations in the repair tissue, which were prevented by PRP treatment. Moreover, investigating the effects of microgravity and PRP on an in vitro wound healing model, it was found that PRP is able to counteract the microgravity-induced impairment in fibroblast migration to the wound site. This could be one of the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of PRP in preventing healing impairment in unloading conditions.

Effect of unloading condition on the healing process and effectiveness of platelet rich plasma as a countermeasure: study on in vivo and in vitro wound healing models / Francesca Cialdai, Alessandra Colciago, Desiré Pantalone, Angela Maria Rizzo, Stefania Zava, Lucia Morbidelli, Fabio Celotti, Daniele Bani, Monica Monici. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - ELETTRONICO. - 21:(2020), pp. 0-0. [10.3390/ijms21020407]

Effect of unloading condition on the healing process and effectiveness of platelet rich plasma as a countermeasure: study on in vivo and in vitro wound healing models

Francesca Cialdai
Investigation
;
Desiré Pantalone
Investigation
;
Daniele Bani
Investigation
;
Monica Monici
Supervision
2020

Abstract

Wound healing is a very complex process that allows organisms to survive injuries. It is strictly regulated by a number of biochemical and physical factors, mechanical forces included. Studying wound healing in space is interesting for two main reasons: (i) defining tools, procedures, and protocols to manage serious wounds and burns eventually occurring in future long-lasting space exploration missions, without the possibility of timely medical evacuation to Earth; (ii) understanding the role of gravity and mechanical factors in the healing process and scarring, thus contributing to unravelling the mechanisms underlying the switching between perfect regeneration and imperfect repair with scarring. In the study presented here, a new in vivo sutured wound healing model in the leech (Hirudo medicinalis) has been used to evaluate the effect of unloading conditions on the healing process and the effectiveness of platelet rich plasma (PRP) as a countermeasure. The results reveal that microgravity caused a healing delay and structural alterations in the repair tissue, which were prevented by PRP treatment. Moreover, investigating the effects of microgravity and PRP on an in vitro wound healing model, it was found that PRP is able to counteract the microgravity-induced impairment in fibroblast migration to the wound site. This could be one of the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of PRP in preventing healing impairment in unloading conditions.
2020
21
0
0
Francesca Cialdai, Alessandra Colciago, Desiré Pantalone, Angela Maria Rizzo, Stefania Zava, Lucia Morbidelli, Fabio Celotti, Daniele Bani, Monica Mo...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1192854
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