Lipoptena cervi (Linnaeus, 1758), Lipoptena fortisetosa Maa, 1965, Hippobosca equina Linnaeus, 1758, and Pseudolynchia canariensis (Macquart, 1840) (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) are hematophagous ectoparasites that infest different mammal and bird species and occasionally attack humans. They are known for the health implications they have as vectors of pathogens to humans and animals, and for the injuries they inflict on their host’s skin. This study focused on the morphological structures evolved by parasites in terms of their biology and the different environment types that they inhabit. To this aim, we examined four hippoboscid species, as well as their hosts’ fur (ungulate and horse), and feather (pigeon) through light and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations in order to highlight the main morphological features that evolved differently in these flies and to explain the effect of hosts’ fur/feather microhabitats on the morphological specializations observed in the investigated ectoparasites. The studied species showed main convergent characters in mouthparts while remarkable differences have been detected on the antennal sensillar pattern as well as on the leg acropod that displayed divergent characters evolved in relation to the host.

Evolutionary adaptations in four hippoboscid fly species belonging to three different subfamilies / Annalisa Andreani, Patrizia Sacchetti, Antonio Belcari. - In: MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY. - ISSN 1365-2915. - STAMPA. - 34:(2020), pp. 344-363. [10.1111/mve.12448]

Evolutionary adaptations in four hippoboscid fly species belonging to three different subfamilies

Annalisa Andreani;Patrizia Sacchetti
;
Antonio Belcari
2020

Abstract

Lipoptena cervi (Linnaeus, 1758), Lipoptena fortisetosa Maa, 1965, Hippobosca equina Linnaeus, 1758, and Pseudolynchia canariensis (Macquart, 1840) (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) are hematophagous ectoparasites that infest different mammal and bird species and occasionally attack humans. They are known for the health implications they have as vectors of pathogens to humans and animals, and for the injuries they inflict on their host’s skin. This study focused on the morphological structures evolved by parasites in terms of their biology and the different environment types that they inhabit. To this aim, we examined four hippoboscid species, as well as their hosts’ fur (ungulate and horse), and feather (pigeon) through light and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations in order to highlight the main morphological features that evolved differently in these flies and to explain the effect of hosts’ fur/feather microhabitats on the morphological specializations observed in the investigated ectoparasites. The studied species showed main convergent characters in mouthparts while remarkable differences have been detected on the antennal sensillar pattern as well as on the leg acropod that displayed divergent characters evolved in relation to the host.
2020
34
344
363
Goal 15: Life on land
Annalisa Andreani, Patrizia Sacchetti, Antonio Belcari
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1193617
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