Vegetable produce can host human pathogens without exhibiting any sign of spoilage, raising concerns about food safety. Over the production chain, vegetables can be exposed to different routes of contamination to enteric pathogens, including during cultivation and at harvest. For this reason, foodborne disease control should start in the field. Agronomic practices, that have been used for long time to control the spread of phytopathogens in crops, are here reviewed in light of their contribution for limiting pre- and post-harvest contamination and proliferation of human pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae in vegetables. Based on up-to-date literature, this review aims to highlight the agronomic practices able to support produce safety: i) Variability in susceptibility to Enterobacteriaceae detected within vegetable species raises perspectives for selecting tolerant cultivars and grafting on tolerant rootstocks. ii) Soil solarization protects plants from Enterobacteriaceae contamination. iii) Correct fertilization and irrigation, including the use of safe fertilizers and water, as well as avoiding excess of nitrogen and water, are important, and hydroponics usually implicates a more controlled environment. iv) Pesticide and biocontrol can limit Enterobacteriaceae. v) Harvest not only requires hygienic conditions, but can be also modulated in relation to maturity stage and climatic conditions.

Agronomic practices to limit pre- and post-harvest contamination and proliferation of human pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae in vegetable produce / Anna Lenzi, Massimiliano Marvasi, Ada Baldi. - In: FOOD CONTROL. - ISSN 0956-7135. - STAMPA. - (2020), pp. 0-0.

Agronomic practices to limit pre- and post-harvest contamination and proliferation of human pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae in vegetable produce

Anna Lenzi;Massimiliano Marvasi
;
Ada Baldi
2020

Abstract

Vegetable produce can host human pathogens without exhibiting any sign of spoilage, raising concerns about food safety. Over the production chain, vegetables can be exposed to different routes of contamination to enteric pathogens, including during cultivation and at harvest. For this reason, foodborne disease control should start in the field. Agronomic practices, that have been used for long time to control the spread of phytopathogens in crops, are here reviewed in light of their contribution for limiting pre- and post-harvest contamination and proliferation of human pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae in vegetables. Based on up-to-date literature, this review aims to highlight the agronomic practices able to support produce safety: i) Variability in susceptibility to Enterobacteriaceae detected within vegetable species raises perspectives for selecting tolerant cultivars and grafting on tolerant rootstocks. ii) Soil solarization protects plants from Enterobacteriaceae contamination. iii) Correct fertilization and irrigation, including the use of safe fertilizers and water, as well as avoiding excess of nitrogen and water, are important, and hydroponics usually implicates a more controlled environment. iv) Pesticide and biocontrol can limit Enterobacteriaceae. v) Harvest not only requires hygienic conditions, but can be also modulated in relation to maturity stage and climatic conditions.
2020
0
0
Goal 3: Good health and well-being for people
Anna Lenzi, Massimiliano Marvasi, Ada Baldi
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1201286
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