It has been hypothesized that the Neolithic transition towards an agricultural and pastoralist economy facilitated the emergence of human-adapted pathogens. Here, we recovered eight Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica genomes from human skeletons of transitional foragers, pastoralists and agropastoralists in western Eurasia that were up to 6,500 yr old. Despite the high genetic diversity of S. enterica, all ancient bacterial genomes clustered in a single previously uncharacterized branch that contains S. enterica adapted to multiple mammalian species. All ancient bacterial genomes from prehistoric (agro-)pastoralists fall within a part of this branch that also includes the human-specific S. enterica Paratyphi C, illustrating the evolution of a human pathogen over a period of 5,000 yr. Bacterial genomic comparisons suggest that the earlier ancient strains were not host specific, differed in pathogenic potential and experienced convergent pseudogenization that accompanied their downstream host adaptation. These observations support the concept that the emergence of human-adapted S. enterica is linked to human cultural transformations.

Emergence of human-adapted Salmonella enterica is linked to the Neolithization process / Key F.M.; Posth C.; Esquivel-Gomez L.R.; Hubler R.; Spyrou M.A.; Neumann G.U.; Furtwangler A.; Sabin S.; Burri M.; Wissgott A.; Lankapalli A.K.; Vagene A.J.; Meyer M.; Nagel S.; Tukhbatova R.; Khokhlov A.; Chizhevsky A.; Hansen S.; Belinsky A.B.; Kalmykov A.; Kantorovich A.R.; Maslov V.E.; Stockhammer P.W.; Vai S.; Zavattaro M.; Riga A.; Caramelli D.; Skeates R.; Beckett J.; Gradoli M.G.; Steuri N.; Hafner A.; Ramstein M.; Siebke I.; Losch S.; Erdal Y.S.; Alikhan N.-F.; Zhou Z.; Achtman M.; Bos K.; Reinhold S.; Haak W.; Kuhnert D.; Herbig A.; Krause J.. - In: NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION. - ISSN 2397-334X. - ELETTRONICO. - 4:(2020), pp. 324-333. [10.1038/s41559-020-1106-9]

Emergence of human-adapted Salmonella enterica is linked to the Neolithization process

Vai S.;Zavattaro M.;Riga A.;Caramelli D.;
2020

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that the Neolithic transition towards an agricultural and pastoralist economy facilitated the emergence of human-adapted pathogens. Here, we recovered eight Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica genomes from human skeletons of transitional foragers, pastoralists and agropastoralists in western Eurasia that were up to 6,500 yr old. Despite the high genetic diversity of S. enterica, all ancient bacterial genomes clustered in a single previously uncharacterized branch that contains S. enterica adapted to multiple mammalian species. All ancient bacterial genomes from prehistoric (agro-)pastoralists fall within a part of this branch that also includes the human-specific S. enterica Paratyphi C, illustrating the evolution of a human pathogen over a period of 5,000 yr. Bacterial genomic comparisons suggest that the earlier ancient strains were not host specific, differed in pathogenic potential and experienced convergent pseudogenization that accompanied their downstream host adaptation. These observations support the concept that the emergence of human-adapted S. enterica is linked to human cultural transformations.
2020
4
324
333
Key F.M.; Posth C.; Esquivel-Gomez L.R.; Hubler R.; Spyrou M.A.; Neumann G.U.; Furtwangler A.; Sabin S.; Burri M.; Wissgott A.; Lankapalli A.K.; Vagene A.J.; Meyer M.; Nagel S.; Tukhbatova R.; Khokhlov A.; Chizhevsky A.; Hansen S.; Belinsky A.B.; Kalmykov A.; Kantorovich A.R.; Maslov V.E.; Stockhammer P.W.; Vai S.; Zavattaro M.; Riga A.; Caramelli D.; Skeates R.; Beckett J.; Gradoli M.G.; Steuri N.; Hafner A.; Ramstein M.; Siebke I.; Losch S.; Erdal Y.S.; Alikhan N.-F.; Zhou Z.; Achtman M.; Bos K.; Reinhold S.; Haak W.; Kuhnert D.; Herbig A.; Krause J.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
s41559-020-1106-9_1584370549_1.pdf

Accesso chiuso

Tipologia: Versione finale referata (Postprint, Accepted manuscript)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 8.22 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
8.22 MB Adobe PDF   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in FLORE sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1220563
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 60
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 51
social impact