The transport of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus in plants is an exciting and constantly expanding topic, which has attracted much attention in recent years. The study of protein transport within the secretory pathway is a relatively new field, dating back to the 1970s for mammalian cells and considerably later for plants. This may explain why COPI- and COPII-mediated transport between the ER and the Golgi in plants is only now becoming clear, while the existence of these pathways in other organisms is relatively well documented. We summarize current knowledge of these protein transport routes, as well as highlighting key differences between those of plant systems and those of mammals and yeast. These differences have necessitated the study of plant-specific aspects of protein transport in the early secretory pathway, and this review discusses recent developments in this area. Advances in live-cell-imaging technology have allowed the observation of protein movement in vivo, giving a new insight into many of the processes involved in vesicle formation and protein trafficking. The use of these new technologies has been combined with more traditional methods, such as protein biochemistry and electron microscopy, to increase our understanding of the transport routes in the cell. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2005.

Crossing the divide - Transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus in plants / Hanton S.L.; Bortolotti L.E.; Renna L.; Stefano G.; Brandizzi F.. - In: TRAFFIC. - ISSN 1398-9219. - ELETTRONICO. - 6:(2005), pp. 267-277. [10.1111/j.1600-0854.2005.00278.x]

Crossing the divide - Transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus in plants

Renna L.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Stefano G.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
2005

Abstract

The transport of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus in plants is an exciting and constantly expanding topic, which has attracted much attention in recent years. The study of protein transport within the secretory pathway is a relatively new field, dating back to the 1970s for mammalian cells and considerably later for plants. This may explain why COPI- and COPII-mediated transport between the ER and the Golgi in plants is only now becoming clear, while the existence of these pathways in other organisms is relatively well documented. We summarize current knowledge of these protein transport routes, as well as highlighting key differences between those of plant systems and those of mammals and yeast. These differences have necessitated the study of plant-specific aspects of protein transport in the early secretory pathway, and this review discusses recent developments in this area. Advances in live-cell-imaging technology have allowed the observation of protein movement in vivo, giving a new insight into many of the processes involved in vesicle formation and protein trafficking. The use of these new technologies has been combined with more traditional methods, such as protein biochemistry and electron microscopy, to increase our understanding of the transport routes in the cell. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2005.
2005
6
267
277
Hanton S.L.; Bortolotti L.E.; Renna L.; Stefano G.; Brandizzi F.
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1230168
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