The use of lean premixed flames to control combustion temperature and limit nitric oxides (NOx) formation is a common practice in all the applications of land-based gas turbines irrespective of their size and power production capacity. Despite the capability of lean premixed combustion to nominally reduce NOx emissions well below the most strict international regulations, such technology still requires improvements to overcome the impact on whole engine operability due to possible onset of combustion instabilities and flame lean blow-out (LBO). Both phenomena involve highly unsteady processes resulting in challenging numerical modeling. Particularly critical is the prediction of lean blow-out mechanisms where the role of finite rate chemistry and turbulence cannot be easily simplified. The current study aims at proving the capability of a CFD methodology based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and on an extended version of the Turbulent Flame Closure (TFC), to describe and properly catching the dynamics of flame extinction at the leanest operating conditions in typical turbulent lean premixed flames adopted in gas turbine combustors. The methodology is first validated on a laboratory test case where detailed experimental results are available. The extended TFC model well describes the LBO process observed in an atmospheric swirl stabilized burner investigated at the University of Cambridge. The proposed approach is then applied to the investigation of a real scale combustor operated with a swirl lean burner, representing the standard device adopted by Baker-Hughes on the heavy-duty 16 MW class engine Nova LT16. An accelerated numerical procedure is used to trigger the LBO, considering both constant firing temperature and constant pilot split conditions. An excellent agreement is observed with respect to the data obtained on a full-annular test rig, confirming the validity of the developed LBO modeling strategy which can be used in design phase to improve the overall engine operability.

Lean blow-out prediction in an industrial gas turbine combustor through a LES-based CFD analysis / Nassini P.C.; Pampaloni D.; Meloni R.; Andreini A.. - In: COMBUSTION AND FLAME. - ISSN 0010-2180. - ELETTRONICO. - 229:(2021), pp. 111391-111405. [10.1016/j.combustflame.2021.02.037]

Lean blow-out prediction in an industrial gas turbine combustor through a LES-based CFD analysis

Nassini P. C.;Pampaloni D.;Andreini A.
2021

Abstract

The use of lean premixed flames to control combustion temperature and limit nitric oxides (NOx) formation is a common practice in all the applications of land-based gas turbines irrespective of their size and power production capacity. Despite the capability of lean premixed combustion to nominally reduce NOx emissions well below the most strict international regulations, such technology still requires improvements to overcome the impact on whole engine operability due to possible onset of combustion instabilities and flame lean blow-out (LBO). Both phenomena involve highly unsteady processes resulting in challenging numerical modeling. Particularly critical is the prediction of lean blow-out mechanisms where the role of finite rate chemistry and turbulence cannot be easily simplified. The current study aims at proving the capability of a CFD methodology based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and on an extended version of the Turbulent Flame Closure (TFC), to describe and properly catching the dynamics of flame extinction at the leanest operating conditions in typical turbulent lean premixed flames adopted in gas turbine combustors. The methodology is first validated on a laboratory test case where detailed experimental results are available. The extended TFC model well describes the LBO process observed in an atmospheric swirl stabilized burner investigated at the University of Cambridge. The proposed approach is then applied to the investigation of a real scale combustor operated with a swirl lean burner, representing the standard device adopted by Baker-Hughes on the heavy-duty 16 MW class engine Nova LT16. An accelerated numerical procedure is used to trigger the LBO, considering both constant firing temperature and constant pilot split conditions. An excellent agreement is observed with respect to the data obtained on a full-annular test rig, confirming the validity of the developed LBO modeling strategy which can be used in design phase to improve the overall engine operability.
2021
229
111391
111405
Nassini P.C.; Pampaloni D.; Meloni R.; Andreini A.
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1256937
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