Skeletal muscle accounts for almost 40% of the total adult human body mass. This tissue is essential for structural and mechanical functions such as posture, locomotion, and breathing, and it is endowed with an extraordinary ability to adapt to physiological changes associated with growth and physical exercise, as well as tissue damage. Moreover, skeletal muscle is the most age-sensitive tissue in mammals. Due to aging, but also to several diseases, muscle wasting occurs with a loss of muscle mass and functionality, resulting from disuse atrophy and defective muscle regeneration, associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, which are the cells responsible for maintaining and repairing adult muscle. The most established cell lines commonly used to study muscle homeostasis come from rodents, but there is a need to study skeletal muscle using human models, which, due to ethical implications, consist primarily of in vitro culture, which is the only alternative way to vertebrate model organisms. This review will survey in vitro 2D/3D models of human satellite cells to assess skeletal muscle biology for pre-clinical investigations and future directions.

Available in vitro models for human satellite cells from skeletal muscle / Romagnoli C.; Iantomasi T.; Brandi M.L.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1661-6596. - ELETTRONICO. - 22:(2021), pp. 1-17. [10.3390/ijms222413221]

Available in vitro models for human satellite cells from skeletal muscle

Romagnoli C.;Iantomasi T.;Brandi M. L.
2021

Abstract

Skeletal muscle accounts for almost 40% of the total adult human body mass. This tissue is essential for structural and mechanical functions such as posture, locomotion, and breathing, and it is endowed with an extraordinary ability to adapt to physiological changes associated with growth and physical exercise, as well as tissue damage. Moreover, skeletal muscle is the most age-sensitive tissue in mammals. Due to aging, but also to several diseases, muscle wasting occurs with a loss of muscle mass and functionality, resulting from disuse atrophy and defective muscle regeneration, associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, which are the cells responsible for maintaining and repairing adult muscle. The most established cell lines commonly used to study muscle homeostasis come from rodents, but there is a need to study skeletal muscle using human models, which, due to ethical implications, consist primarily of in vitro culture, which is the only alternative way to vertebrate model organisms. This review will survey in vitro 2D/3D models of human satellite cells to assess skeletal muscle biology for pre-clinical investigations and future directions.
2021
22
1
17
Romagnoli C.; Iantomasi T.; Brandi M.L.
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1257105
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