Background: Amyloidosis is considered a rare heterogeneous condition comprising different entities. Epidemiological data are limited and often controversial. We aimed to examine epidemiological changes in amyloidosis diagnosed over a 20-year period at a tertiary referral centre for amyloidosis. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical files from all patients diagnosed with amyloidosis between January 2000 and December 2019, at Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. Diagnosis of amyloidosis was performed as per current clinical practice and scientific evidence at the time of patient evaluation. Results: We reported data on 654 consecutive patients: 274 (42%) wild type transthyretin amyloidosis (wtATTR), 68 (10%) genetic variant amyloidosis (vATTR), 281 (43%) light-chain amyloidosis (AL) and 31 (5%) serum amyloid A amyloidosis (AA). With limited fluctuations, the absolute number of new AL diagnosis increased during the 20-year period. wtATTR was unrecognized before 2009 but represented by far the most common aetiology at the end of the observation period. AA represented a residual diagnosis throughout the entire examined period. Conclusions: Following a rapid and marked increase in the number of new diagnoses over the last decade, ATTR represents by far the most common type of amyloidosis in our regional centre. These data contrasts with recent reports from national referral institutions and may help shed light on the epidemiology of the disease at the community level.

Changes in the perceived epidemiology of amyloidosis: 20 year-experience from a Tertiary Referral Centre in Tuscany / Zampieri M.; Nardi G.; Del Monaco G.; Allinovi M.; Gabriele M.; Zocchi C.; Casagrande S.; Fumagalli C.; Di Mario C.; Olivotto I.; Perfetto F.; Cappelli F.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY. - ISSN 0167-5273. - STAMPA. - 335:(2021), pp. 123-127. [10.1016/j.ijcard.2021.04.023]

Changes in the perceived epidemiology of amyloidosis: 20 year-experience from a Tertiary Referral Centre in Tuscany

Zampieri M.;Nardi G.;Del Monaco G.;Allinovi M.;Gabriele M.;Zocchi C.;Casagrande S.;Fumagalli C.;Di Mario C.;Olivotto I.;Perfetto F.;Cappelli F.
2021

Abstract

Background: Amyloidosis is considered a rare heterogeneous condition comprising different entities. Epidemiological data are limited and often controversial. We aimed to examine epidemiological changes in amyloidosis diagnosed over a 20-year period at a tertiary referral centre for amyloidosis. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical files from all patients diagnosed with amyloidosis between January 2000 and December 2019, at Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. Diagnosis of amyloidosis was performed as per current clinical practice and scientific evidence at the time of patient evaluation. Results: We reported data on 654 consecutive patients: 274 (42%) wild type transthyretin amyloidosis (wtATTR), 68 (10%) genetic variant amyloidosis (vATTR), 281 (43%) light-chain amyloidosis (AL) and 31 (5%) serum amyloid A amyloidosis (AA). With limited fluctuations, the absolute number of new AL diagnosis increased during the 20-year period. wtATTR was unrecognized before 2009 but represented by far the most common aetiology at the end of the observation period. AA represented a residual diagnosis throughout the entire examined period. Conclusions: Following a rapid and marked increase in the number of new diagnoses over the last decade, ATTR represents by far the most common type of amyloidosis in our regional centre. These data contrasts with recent reports from national referral institutions and may help shed light on the epidemiology of the disease at the community level.
335
123
127
Zampieri M.; Nardi G.; Del Monaco G.; Allinovi M.; Gabriele M.; Zocchi C.; Casagrande S.; Fumagalli C.; Di Mario C.; Olivotto I.; Perfetto F.; Cappelli F.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S0167527321006598-main.pdf

embargo fino al 01/03/2023

Tipologia: Pdf editoriale (Version of record)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 568.74 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
568.74 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in FLORE sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1261118
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 15
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 12
social impact