A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the possible relationship between chronotype, sleeping, and eating patterns in 74 Italian adults (71.6% women). Based on Morningness-Eveningness Questionnare (MEQ) score, participants were classified as morning (n = 24), intermediate (n = 25), and evening (n = 25) chronotypes. From analysis, no significant differences among chronotypes emerged for sleep habits. As to eating behaviours, the evening subjects showed a significant (p < 0.05) shift towards later hours of the day in the consumption of all meals, except dinner. In addition, the evening subjects had a later midpoint of energy intake (EI) of about 35 min and 1 h (p < 0.001), respectively, than the intermediate and morning subjects. Analysing the diet quality, morning subjects reported significantly (p = 0.030) lower consumption of sweets and sweeteners, and significantly (p = 0.035) lower intake of ultra-processed fats and seasonings. Evening subjects showed a significant delay in EI during the day, while morning subjects reported a better-quality diet.

Association between chronotype, sleep pattern, and eating behaviours in a group of Italian adults / Rosi, Alice; Lotti, Sofia; Vitale, Marilena; Pagliai, Giuditta; Madarena, Maria Pia; Bonaccio, Marialaura; Esposito, Simona; Ferraris, Cinzia; Guglielmetti, Monica; Angelino, Donato; Martini, Daniela; Dinu, Monica. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCES AND NUTRITION. - ISSN 0963-7486. - ELETTRONICO. - (2022), pp. 1-8. [10.1080/09637486.2022.2105826]

Association between chronotype, sleep pattern, and eating behaviours in a group of Italian adults

Lotti, Sofia
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Pagliai, Giuditta
Investigation
;
Madarena, Maria Pia
Investigation
;
Dinu, Monica
Conceptualization
2022

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the possible relationship between chronotype, sleeping, and eating patterns in 74 Italian adults (71.6% women). Based on Morningness-Eveningness Questionnare (MEQ) score, participants were classified as morning (n = 24), intermediate (n = 25), and evening (n = 25) chronotypes. From analysis, no significant differences among chronotypes emerged for sleep habits. As to eating behaviours, the evening subjects showed a significant (p < 0.05) shift towards later hours of the day in the consumption of all meals, except dinner. In addition, the evening subjects had a later midpoint of energy intake (EI) of about 35 min and 1 h (p < 0.001), respectively, than the intermediate and morning subjects. Analysing the diet quality, morning subjects reported significantly (p = 0.030) lower consumption of sweets and sweeteners, and significantly (p = 0.035) lower intake of ultra-processed fats and seasonings. Evening subjects showed a significant delay in EI during the day, while morning subjects reported a better-quality diet.
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Rosi, Alice; Lotti, Sofia; Vitale, Marilena; Pagliai, Giuditta; Madarena, Maria Pia; Bonaccio, Marialaura; Esposito, Simona; Ferraris, Cinzia; Guglielmetti, Monica; Angelino, Donato; Martini, Daniela; Dinu, Monica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2158/1278239
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