Outdoor air pollution is considered as the most serious environmental problem for human health, associated with some million deaths worldwide per year. Cities have to cope with the challenges due to poor air quality impacting human health and citizen well-being. According to an analysis in the framework of this study, the annual mean concentrations of tropospheric ozone (O-3) have been increasing by on average 0.16 ppb year(-1) in cities across the globe over the time period 1995-2014. Green urban infrastructure can improve air quality by removing O-3. To efficiently reduce O-3 in cities, it is important to define suitable urban forest management, including proper species selection, with focus on the removal ability of O-3 and other air pollutants, biogenic emission rates, allergenic effects and maintenance requirements. This study reanalyzes the literature to i) quantify O-3 removal by urban vegetation categorized into trees/shrubs and green roofs; ii) rank 95 urban plant species based on the ability to maximize air quality and minimize disservices, and iii) provide novel insights on the management of urban green spaces to maximize urban air quality. Trees showed higher O-3 removal capacity (3.4 g m(-2) year(-1) on average) than green roofs (2.9 g m(-2) year(-1) as average removal rate), with lower installation and maintenance costs (around 10 times). To overcome present gaps and uncertainties, a novel Species specific Air Quality Index (S-AQI) of suitability to air quality improvement is proposed for tree/shrub species. We recommend city planners to select species with an S-AQI>8, i.e. with high O-3 removal capacity, O-3-tolerant, resistant to pests and diseases, tolerant to drought and non-allergenic (e.g. Acer sp., Carpinus sp., Larix decidua, Prunus sp.). Green roofs can be used to supplement urban trees in improving air quality in cities. Urban vegetation, as a cost-effective and nature-based approach, aids in meeting clean air standards and should be taken into account by policy-makers. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Should we see urban trees as effective solutions to reduce increasing ozone levels in cities? / Sicard, Pierre; Agathokleous, Evgenios; Araminiene, Valda; Carrari, Elisa; Hoshika, Yasutomo; De Marco, Alessandra; Paoletti, Elena. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION. - ISSN 0269-7491. - ELETTRONICO. - 243:(2018), pp. 163-176. [10.1016/j.envpol.2018.08.049]

Should we see urban trees as effective solutions to reduce increasing ozone levels in cities?

Carrari, Elisa;
2018

Abstract

Outdoor air pollution is considered as the most serious environmental problem for human health, associated with some million deaths worldwide per year. Cities have to cope with the challenges due to poor air quality impacting human health and citizen well-being. According to an analysis in the framework of this study, the annual mean concentrations of tropospheric ozone (O-3) have been increasing by on average 0.16 ppb year(-1) in cities across the globe over the time period 1995-2014. Green urban infrastructure can improve air quality by removing O-3. To efficiently reduce O-3 in cities, it is important to define suitable urban forest management, including proper species selection, with focus on the removal ability of O-3 and other air pollutants, biogenic emission rates, allergenic effects and maintenance requirements. This study reanalyzes the literature to i) quantify O-3 removal by urban vegetation categorized into trees/shrubs and green roofs; ii) rank 95 urban plant species based on the ability to maximize air quality and minimize disservices, and iii) provide novel insights on the management of urban green spaces to maximize urban air quality. Trees showed higher O-3 removal capacity (3.4 g m(-2) year(-1) on average) than green roofs (2.9 g m(-2) year(-1) as average removal rate), with lower installation and maintenance costs (around 10 times). To overcome present gaps and uncertainties, a novel Species specific Air Quality Index (S-AQI) of suitability to air quality improvement is proposed for tree/shrub species. We recommend city planners to select species with an S-AQI>8, i.e. with high O-3 removal capacity, O-3-tolerant, resistant to pests and diseases, tolerant to drought and non-allergenic (e.g. Acer sp., Carpinus sp., Larix decidua, Prunus sp.). Green roofs can be used to supplement urban trees in improving air quality in cities. Urban vegetation, as a cost-effective and nature-based approach, aids in meeting clean air standards and should be taken into account by policy-makers. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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163
176
Goal 11: Sustainable cities and communities
Goal 13: Climate action
Goal 15: Life on land
Sicard, Pierre; Agathokleous, Evgenios; Araminiene, Valda; Carrari, Elisa; Hoshika, Yasutomo; De Marco, Alessandra; Paoletti, Elena
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1282063
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