Clinical studies clearly indicate that endometriosis is a condition associated with high levels of chronic stress. The stress intensity correlates with pain severity and disease extension. However, it is unknown whether chronic stress represents a primary cause of endometriosis and, therefore, if avoiding or treating chronic stress may reduce the risk of developing endometriosis. Repeated, uncontrolled stress either before or after experimental endometriosis induction promotes disease mechanisms and accelerates lesion growth in rodents. Furthermore, patients with endometriosis have a heightened risk of other inflammatory and immune-related diseases, many of which have also been associated with stress. Here, we review the latest evidences regarding the relationship between chronic stress and endometriosis and discuss the potential bidirectional aspect of such association. Further research may clarify if endometriosis is a cause and/or a consequence of stress and whether stress-reducing therapies are effective to mitigate symptoms and slow down the development of endometriotic lesions.

Is Stress a Cause or a Consequence of Endometriosis? / Reis, Fernando M; Coutinho, Larissa M; Vannuccini, Silvia; Luisi, Stefano; Petraglia, Felice. - In: REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES. - ISSN 1933-7205. - ELETTRONICO. - 27:(2020), pp. 39-45. [10.1007/s43032-019-00053-0]

Is Stress a Cause or a Consequence of Endometriosis?

Vannuccini, Silvia;Petraglia, Felice
2020

Abstract

Clinical studies clearly indicate that endometriosis is a condition associated with high levels of chronic stress. The stress intensity correlates with pain severity and disease extension. However, it is unknown whether chronic stress represents a primary cause of endometriosis and, therefore, if avoiding or treating chronic stress may reduce the risk of developing endometriosis. Repeated, uncontrolled stress either before or after experimental endometriosis induction promotes disease mechanisms and accelerates lesion growth in rodents. Furthermore, patients with endometriosis have a heightened risk of other inflammatory and immune-related diseases, many of which have also been associated with stress. Here, we review the latest evidences regarding the relationship between chronic stress and endometriosis and discuss the potential bidirectional aspect of such association. Further research may clarify if endometriosis is a cause and/or a consequence of stress and whether stress-reducing therapies are effective to mitigate symptoms and slow down the development of endometriotic lesions.
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Reis, Fernando M; Coutinho, Larissa M; Vannuccini, Silvia; Luisi, Stefano; Petraglia, Felice
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1282619
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