Older adults' engagement in various prosocial activities is a salient question in present-day societies that aim to promote active ageing. However, there are only a few studies focusing on associations between several types of prosocial activities, and they have rarely considered help to relatives and friends separately. Moreover, there is lack of studies considering informal monetary help and charity donations when analysing multiple prosocial activities. Using population-based data of older Finns (N = 2,184), we examined whether providing informal help (i.e. practical help, financial support or personal care) to relatives and friends is associated with participation in volunteering and charity, respectively. Overall, 5 per cent of the participants provided all examined forms of informal help and volunteered, 16 per cent provided two types of help and volunteered, and 23 per cent provided one type of help and volunteered. In addition, 9 per cent of the participants provided all types of informal help and made charitable donations, 33 per cent provided two types of help and made charitable donations, and 54 per cent provided one type of help and made charitable donations. Practical help and care channelled outside the household were associated with an increased probability of volunteering, although they were not associated with the probability of making charitable donations. Practical help, financial support and personal care provided to friends were particularly important predictors of volunteering and charity. These results are discussed in the context of the role overload and role extension hypotheses.

Prosocial activity in later life: are informal help and care associated with volunteering and charity? / Tanskanen, AO; Hamalainen, H; Arpino, B; Danielsbacka, M. - In: AGEING AND SOCIETY. - ISSN 0144-686X. - ELETTRONICO. - ...:(In corso di stampa), pp. 0-0. [10.1017/S0144686X22001015]

Prosocial activity in later life: are informal help and care associated with volunteering and charity?

Arpino, B;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Older adults' engagement in various prosocial activities is a salient question in present-day societies that aim to promote active ageing. However, there are only a few studies focusing on associations between several types of prosocial activities, and they have rarely considered help to relatives and friends separately. Moreover, there is lack of studies considering informal monetary help and charity donations when analysing multiple prosocial activities. Using population-based data of older Finns (N = 2,184), we examined whether providing informal help (i.e. practical help, financial support or personal care) to relatives and friends is associated with participation in volunteering and charity, respectively. Overall, 5 per cent of the participants provided all examined forms of informal help and volunteered, 16 per cent provided two types of help and volunteered, and 23 per cent provided one type of help and volunteered. In addition, 9 per cent of the participants provided all types of informal help and made charitable donations, 33 per cent provided two types of help and made charitable donations, and 54 per cent provided one type of help and made charitable donations. Practical help and care channelled outside the household were associated with an increased probability of volunteering, although they were not associated with the probability of making charitable donations. Practical help, financial support and personal care provided to friends were particularly important predictors of volunteering and charity. These results are discussed in the context of the role overload and role extension hypotheses.
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Tanskanen, AO; Hamalainen, H; Arpino, B; Danielsbacka, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1285202
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