Objectives Assessing the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure during acute physical exertion can allow the discovery of many cardiovascular diseases even at a young age. However, this response depends on the age, sex of the subject, and the modality of the graded exercise test. This study aims to provide sex-and age-related normative values of peak and recovery blood pressure performance and to develop a predicted model of SBP and DBP peak in young athletes. Design Retrospective study. Methods We analyzed 8224 young athletes (5516 males and 2708 females) aged between 8 and 18 who underwent pre-participation screening to obtain eligibility for competitive sport. Anthropometric and blood pressure parameters related to the effort are reported. Then, according to sex, graded exercise test modality, and age were calculated 1) the fifth, tenth, fiftieth, ninetieth, and ninety-fifth percentiles for the SBP and DBP at peak and after one minute of recovery; 2) predictive equations of SPB and DBP at the peak. Results Younger athletes show lower peak blood pressure values, gradually increasing as they age. Males showed higher peak SBP values starting at 12–13 years on the cycle ergometer and 10–11 years on the treadmill, while there was no difference in peak DBP values. Conclusions Sex, age, and the specificity of the movement performed must be considered in assessing the blood pressure response in the young population. In addition, providing reference values and predictive equations of BP response to acute physical exertion may allow for a better functional assessment of young athletes.

Normative values and a new predicted model of exercise blood pressure in young athletes / Mascherini, Gabriele; Galanti, Giorgio; Stefani, Laura; Izzicupo, Pascal. - In: JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT. - ISSN 1440-2440. - ELETTRONICO. - S1440-2440:(2022), pp. 00472-8.1-00472-8.9. [10.1016/j.jsams.2022.11.001]

Normative values and a new predicted model of exercise blood pressure in young athletes

Mascherini, Gabriele
;
Galanti, Giorgio;Stefani, Laura;
2022

Abstract

Objectives Assessing the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure during acute physical exertion can allow the discovery of many cardiovascular diseases even at a young age. However, this response depends on the age, sex of the subject, and the modality of the graded exercise test. This study aims to provide sex-and age-related normative values of peak and recovery blood pressure performance and to develop a predicted model of SBP and DBP peak in young athletes. Design Retrospective study. Methods We analyzed 8224 young athletes (5516 males and 2708 females) aged between 8 and 18 who underwent pre-participation screening to obtain eligibility for competitive sport. Anthropometric and blood pressure parameters related to the effort are reported. Then, according to sex, graded exercise test modality, and age were calculated 1) the fifth, tenth, fiftieth, ninetieth, and ninety-fifth percentiles for the SBP and DBP at peak and after one minute of recovery; 2) predictive equations of SPB and DBP at the peak. Results Younger athletes show lower peak blood pressure values, gradually increasing as they age. Males showed higher peak SBP values starting at 12–13 years on the cycle ergometer and 10–11 years on the treadmill, while there was no difference in peak DBP values. Conclusions Sex, age, and the specificity of the movement performed must be considered in assessing the blood pressure response in the young population. In addition, providing reference values and predictive equations of BP response to acute physical exertion may allow for a better functional assessment of young athletes.
S1440-2440
1
9
Mascherini, Gabriele; Galanti, Giorgio; Stefani, Laura; Izzicupo, Pascal
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1288404
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