Background: Chest-tube drainage and prolonged air leak after anatomic lung resection (ALR) continue to drive admission days for most programs employing minimal access techniques. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a novel postoperative recovery protocol with revised chest tube management strategies to target discharge on post-operative day 1 (POD1) after ALR. Methods: This is a pilot study investigating a novel enhanced recovery protocol which either allowed chest tube removal on POD1 or ambulatory management with indwelling chest tube using a portable closed drainage system. We included all patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)-ALR; exclusion criteria were open surgery, non-anatomic or extended resections. Results: A total of 139 patients were included in the study [N=29 portable drainage (PD), N=110 standard pathway (SP)]. POD1 discharge rate was 72% in PD vs. 15% in SP cohort (P<0.001). Median length of stay (LOS) was 1 day [interquartile range (IQR), 1-2 days] in PD cohort, while it was 3 days (IQR, 2-5 days) in SP cohort (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in length of indwelling chest-tube, rate of discharge with chest-tube, post-operative complications, or readmissions. On multivariate analysis, PD pathway as well as short surgical time were significant predictors of discharge on POD1. Conclusions: Our results indicate that POD1 discharge rates of 72% after VATS-ALR can be safely achieved by a well-developed perioperative care pathway and simple chest tube drainage interventions. Based on these findings we are currently drafting a follow-up study to investigate the possibility of performing ALRs as day surgery.

Implication of a novel postoperative recovery protocol to increase day 1 discharge rate after anatomic lung resection / Schmid, S.; Kaafarani, M.; Baldini, G.; Amir, A.; Costescu, F.; Shafiepour, D.; Cools-Lartigue, J.; Najmeh, S.; Sirois, C.; Ferri, L.; Mulder, D.; Spicer, J.. - In: JOURNAL OF THORACIC DISEASE. - ISSN 2072-1439. - STAMPA. - 13:(2021), pp. 6399-6408. [10.21037/jtd-21-965]

Implication of a novel postoperative recovery protocol to increase day 1 discharge rate after anatomic lung resection

Baldini, G.;Ferri, L.;
2021

Abstract

Background: Chest-tube drainage and prolonged air leak after anatomic lung resection (ALR) continue to drive admission days for most programs employing minimal access techniques. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a novel postoperative recovery protocol with revised chest tube management strategies to target discharge on post-operative day 1 (POD1) after ALR. Methods: This is a pilot study investigating a novel enhanced recovery protocol which either allowed chest tube removal on POD1 or ambulatory management with indwelling chest tube using a portable closed drainage system. We included all patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)-ALR; exclusion criteria were open surgery, non-anatomic or extended resections. Results: A total of 139 patients were included in the study [N=29 portable drainage (PD), N=110 standard pathway (SP)]. POD1 discharge rate was 72% in PD vs. 15% in SP cohort (P<0.001). Median length of stay (LOS) was 1 day [interquartile range (IQR), 1-2 days] in PD cohort, while it was 3 days (IQR, 2-5 days) in SP cohort (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in length of indwelling chest-tube, rate of discharge with chest-tube, post-operative complications, or readmissions. On multivariate analysis, PD pathway as well as short surgical time were significant predictors of discharge on POD1. Conclusions: Our results indicate that POD1 discharge rates of 72% after VATS-ALR can be safely achieved by a well-developed perioperative care pathway and simple chest tube drainage interventions. Based on these findings we are currently drafting a follow-up study to investigate the possibility of performing ALRs as day surgery.
13
6399
6408
Goal 3: Good health and well-being
Schmid, S.; Kaafarani, M.; Baldini, G.; Amir, A.; Costescu, F.; Shafiepour, D.; Cools-Lartigue, J.; Najmeh, S.; Sirois, C.; Ferri, L.; Mulder, D.; Spicer, J.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1288927
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