Sand dams are simple and effective structures built across ephemeral riverbeds in arid/ semiarid regions to harvest water within sand pores and increase water availability and quality for rural communities. The complex morphological, hydrological, social, and economic conditions that make sand dams a beneficial tool for water resilience are largely influenced by the siting phase. Proper location of a sand dam can reduce communities' travel time to water points, reduce water conflicts, and increase food security through expansion of irrigated agriculture. On the other hand, a misplacement of sand dams can, at worst, increase disparities in water access and increase local conflicts. To approach a viable siting of sand dams, most projects are developed and delivered with the community through a bottom-up approach. However, in the case of large-scale projects, remote sensing and biophysical analysis are the dominant approach, leaving the socio-economic component at the margins of the siting strategy and eventually affecting the benefits to local communities. In this paper, we propose a large-scale participatory methodology to sand dams siting, which draws on mixed-methods connecting the conventional top-down biophysical analysis with bottom-up participatory research. We first describe the generic approach developed for sand dams siting in Namibe, a semi-arid region of Southwest of Angola, then we draw on our case to propose a generic approach to large-scale participatory siting beyond Namibe.

Large-scale siting of sand dams: A participatory approach and application in Angolan drylands / Piemontese L.; Castelli G.; Limones N.; Grazio A.; Bresci E.. - In: LAND DEGRADATION & DEVELOPMENT. - ISSN 1099-145X. - ELETTRONICO. - In Press:(2022), pp. 1-15. [10.1002/ldr.4500]

Large-scale siting of sand dams: A participatory approach and application in Angolan drylands

Piemontese L.;Castelli G.;Bresci E.
2022

Abstract

Sand dams are simple and effective structures built across ephemeral riverbeds in arid/ semiarid regions to harvest water within sand pores and increase water availability and quality for rural communities. The complex morphological, hydrological, social, and economic conditions that make sand dams a beneficial tool for water resilience are largely influenced by the siting phase. Proper location of a sand dam can reduce communities' travel time to water points, reduce water conflicts, and increase food security through expansion of irrigated agriculture. On the other hand, a misplacement of sand dams can, at worst, increase disparities in water access and increase local conflicts. To approach a viable siting of sand dams, most projects are developed and delivered with the community through a bottom-up approach. However, in the case of large-scale projects, remote sensing and biophysical analysis are the dominant approach, leaving the socio-economic component at the margins of the siting strategy and eventually affecting the benefits to local communities. In this paper, we propose a large-scale participatory methodology to sand dams siting, which draws on mixed-methods connecting the conventional top-down biophysical analysis with bottom-up participatory research. We first describe the generic approach developed for sand dams siting in Namibe, a semi-arid region of Southwest of Angola, then we draw on our case to propose a generic approach to large-scale participatory siting beyond Namibe.
In Press
1
15
Goal 2: Zero hunger
Goal 6: Clean water and sanitation
Piemontese L.; Castelli G.; Limones N.; Grazio A.; Bresci E.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Piemontese_etal_2022_ACCEPTED ARTICLE_Sand dams siting.pdf

Accesso chiuso

Tipologia: Pdf editoriale (Version of record)
Licenza: DRM non definito
Dimensione 3.23 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
3.23 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in FLORE sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1290407
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact