: Linguistic tasks facilitate corticospinal excitability as revealed by increased motor evoked potential (MEP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the dominant hand. This modulation of the primary motor cortex (M1) excitability may reflect the relationship between speech and gestures. It is conceivable that in healthy individuals who use a sign language this cortical excitability modulation could be rearranged. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of spoken language tasks on M1 excitability in a group of hearing signers. Ten hearing Italian Sign Language (LIS) signers and 16 non-signer healthy controls participated. Single-pulse TMS was applied to either M1 hand area at the baseline and during different tasks: (i) reading aloud, (ii) silent reading, (iii) oral movements, (iv) syllabic phonation and (v) looking at meaningless non-letter strings. Overall, M1 excitability during the linguistic and non-linguistic tasks was higher in LIS group compared to the control group. In LIS group, MEPs were significantly larger during reading aloud, silent reading and non-verbal oral movements, regardless the hemisphere. These results suggest that in hearing signers there is a different modulation of the functional connectivity between the speech-related brain network and the motor system.

Language-related motor facilitation in Italian Sign Language signers / Giovannelli, Fabio; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Lucidi, Giulia; Squitieri, Martina; Gavazzi, Gioele; Suppa, Antonio; Berardelli, Alfredo; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Cincotta, Massimo. - In: CEREBRAL CORTEX. - ISSN 1047-3211. - STAMPA. - 33:(2023), pp. 6701-6707. [10.1093/cercor/bhac536]

Language-related motor facilitation in Italian Sign Language signers

Giovannelli, Fabio
Conceptualization
;
Borgheresi, Alessandra;Lucidi, Giulia;Squitieri, Martina;Gavazzi, Gioele;Viggiano, Maria Pia;Cincotta, Massimo
2023

Abstract

: Linguistic tasks facilitate corticospinal excitability as revealed by increased motor evoked potential (MEP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the dominant hand. This modulation of the primary motor cortex (M1) excitability may reflect the relationship between speech and gestures. It is conceivable that in healthy individuals who use a sign language this cortical excitability modulation could be rearranged. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of spoken language tasks on M1 excitability in a group of hearing signers. Ten hearing Italian Sign Language (LIS) signers and 16 non-signer healthy controls participated. Single-pulse TMS was applied to either M1 hand area at the baseline and during different tasks: (i) reading aloud, (ii) silent reading, (iii) oral movements, (iv) syllabic phonation and (v) looking at meaningless non-letter strings. Overall, M1 excitability during the linguistic and non-linguistic tasks was higher in LIS group compared to the control group. In LIS group, MEPs were significantly larger during reading aloud, silent reading and non-verbal oral movements, regardless the hemisphere. These results suggest that in hearing signers there is a different modulation of the functional connectivity between the speech-related brain network and the motor system.
2023
33
6701
6707
Giovannelli, Fabio; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Lucidi, Giulia; Squitieri, Martina; Gavazzi, Gioele; Suppa, Antonio; Berardelli, Alfredo; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Cincotta, Massimo
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1296100
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