Low-grade inflammation alters the homeostasis of the organism and favors the onset of many chronic diseases. The global growth in the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in recent years has been accompanied by an increase in the consumption of ultra-processed foods (UPF). Known to be hyperpalatable, economic and ready-to-eat, increased consumption of UPF has already been recognized as a risk factor for several chronic diseases. Different research groups have tried to investigate whether UPF consumption could promote low-grade inflammation and thus favor the development of noncommunicable diseases. Current evidence highlights the adverse health effects of UPF characteristics, not only due to the nutrients provided by a diet rich in UPF, but also due to the non-nutritive components present in UPF and the effect they may have on gut health. This review aims to summarize the available evidence on the possible relationship between excessive UPF consumption and modulation of low-grade inflammation, as potential promoters of chronic disease.

Low-Grade Inflammation and Ultra-Processed Foods Consumption: A Review / Tristan Asensi M, Napoletano A, Sofi F, Dinu M. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - STAMPA. - 15:(2023), pp. 1546-1552. [10.3390/ nu15061546]

Low-Grade Inflammation and Ultra-Processed Foods Consumption: A Review

Tristan Asensi M
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Napoletano A
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Sofi F
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Dinu M
Writing – Review & Editing
2023

Abstract

Low-grade inflammation alters the homeostasis of the organism and favors the onset of many chronic diseases. The global growth in the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in recent years has been accompanied by an increase in the consumption of ultra-processed foods (UPF). Known to be hyperpalatable, economic and ready-to-eat, increased consumption of UPF has already been recognized as a risk factor for several chronic diseases. Different research groups have tried to investigate whether UPF consumption could promote low-grade inflammation and thus favor the development of noncommunicable diseases. Current evidence highlights the adverse health effects of UPF characteristics, not only due to the nutrients provided by a diet rich in UPF, but also due to the non-nutritive components present in UPF and the effect they may have on gut health. This review aims to summarize the available evidence on the possible relationship between excessive UPF consumption and modulation of low-grade inflammation, as potential promoters of chronic disease.
2023
15
1546
1552
Goal 3: Good health and well-being
Tristan Asensi M, Napoletano A, Sofi F, Dinu M
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1302179
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