Background: The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse perioperative and long-term outcomes of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed in symptomatic patients in a high-volume academic vascular centre, stratifying them according to the type of preoperative symptoms and the timing of surgery with respect to the indexed neurological event. Methods: From January 2014 to December 2020, 1,369 consecutive CEAs were performed at our institution. Data concerning these interventions were prospectively collected in a dedicated database including data concerning preoperative assessment, surgical details, perioperative (<30 days) outcomes, and long-term outcomes. A retrospective analysis of the database was performed, and 213 interventions performed in symptomatic patients were found. We identified 2 subgroups of patients: patients with stable neurological symptoms (not recent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stable major disabling stroke, stable group, and 157 patients) and patients with unstable neurological symptoms (recent TIA, crescendo TIAs, stroke in evolution, acute/recent minor stroke, unstable group, and 56 patients). Perioperative outcomes were analysed in terms of mortality, major neurological events, and local or systemic complications The results were compared using the χ2 test; these were also analysed on the basis of the presenting symptom (isolated TIA, crescendo TIA, stroke in evolution, acute/recent minor stroke, stabilized stroke) and the timing of the intervention relative to the onset of the symptom. Long term results were analysed using the life-table analysis and Kaplan-Meier curves in terms of survival, stroke-free survival, absence of neurological symptoms, and absence of significant restenosis. Results: Overall, 30-day stroke and death rate were 4.2%. (3.1% vs. 7%, P = 0.2). Two deaths occurred at 30 days, both in the stable group (mortality 1.2%, P = 0.4 compared to the unstable group), but no fatal strokes were recorded in the overall sample. No differences were found in terms of new perioperative neurological events and local complications between the 2 groups. We found a trend toward poorer perioperative results in patients operated on within 48 hr from the indexed event and in patients operated on for stroke in evolution or acute/recent stroke, whereas we found a trend toward better results in favour of patients operated on between 8 and 14 days (P = 0.08). The median duration of follow-up was 24.8 months (range 1-78); at 5 years we did not find significant differences in terms of survival and stroke-free survival rates between 2 groups. Conclusions: In our experience, carotid surgery in symptomatic patients provided satisfactory results, particularly in patients with stable neurological status. Among unstable patients, the rate of complications significantly increases, mainly among treated in the very early (<48 hr) period for stroke in evolution or acute/recent stroke. Once the perioperative risk is overcome, the results in the long-term setting are similarly good, both in stable and in unstable patients.

Elective or Urgent Carotid Endarterectomy in Symptomatic Patients: Analysis Based on the Type and Timing of Neurological Symptoms / De Blasis, Serena; Pulli, Raffaele; Di Domenico, Rossella; Nesi, Mascia; Nencini, Patrizia; Fargion, Aaron Thomas; Pratesi, Carlo; Dorigo, Walter. - In: ANNALS OF VASCULAR SURGERY. - ISSN 1615-5947. - STAMPA. - 90:(2023), pp. 7-16. [10.1016/j.avsg.2022.10.023]

Elective or Urgent Carotid Endarterectomy in Symptomatic Patients: Analysis Based on the Type and Timing of Neurological Symptoms

De Blasis, Serena
;
Pulli, Raffaele
;
Di Domenico, Rossella
;
Nesi, Mascia
;
Nencini, Patrizia
;
Fargion, Aaron Thomas
;
Pratesi, Carlo
;
Dorigo, Walter
2023

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse perioperative and long-term outcomes of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed in symptomatic patients in a high-volume academic vascular centre, stratifying them according to the type of preoperative symptoms and the timing of surgery with respect to the indexed neurological event. Methods: From January 2014 to December 2020, 1,369 consecutive CEAs were performed at our institution. Data concerning these interventions were prospectively collected in a dedicated database including data concerning preoperative assessment, surgical details, perioperative (<30 days) outcomes, and long-term outcomes. A retrospective analysis of the database was performed, and 213 interventions performed in symptomatic patients were found. We identified 2 subgroups of patients: patients with stable neurological symptoms (not recent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stable major disabling stroke, stable group, and 157 patients) and patients with unstable neurological symptoms (recent TIA, crescendo TIAs, stroke in evolution, acute/recent minor stroke, unstable group, and 56 patients). Perioperative outcomes were analysed in terms of mortality, major neurological events, and local or systemic complications The results were compared using the χ2 test; these were also analysed on the basis of the presenting symptom (isolated TIA, crescendo TIA, stroke in evolution, acute/recent minor stroke, stabilized stroke) and the timing of the intervention relative to the onset of the symptom. Long term results were analysed using the life-table analysis and Kaplan-Meier curves in terms of survival, stroke-free survival, absence of neurological symptoms, and absence of significant restenosis. Results: Overall, 30-day stroke and death rate were 4.2%. (3.1% vs. 7%, P = 0.2). Two deaths occurred at 30 days, both in the stable group (mortality 1.2%, P = 0.4 compared to the unstable group), but no fatal strokes were recorded in the overall sample. No differences were found in terms of new perioperative neurological events and local complications between the 2 groups. We found a trend toward poorer perioperative results in patients operated on within 48 hr from the indexed event and in patients operated on for stroke in evolution or acute/recent stroke, whereas we found a trend toward better results in favour of patients operated on between 8 and 14 days (P = 0.08). The median duration of follow-up was 24.8 months (range 1-78); at 5 years we did not find significant differences in terms of survival and stroke-free survival rates between 2 groups. Conclusions: In our experience, carotid surgery in symptomatic patients provided satisfactory results, particularly in patients with stable neurological status. Among unstable patients, the rate of complications significantly increases, mainly among treated in the very early (<48 hr) period for stroke in evolution or acute/recent stroke. Once the perioperative risk is overcome, the results in the long-term setting are similarly good, both in stable and in unstable patients.
2023
90
7
16
De Blasis, Serena; Pulli, Raffaele; Di Domenico, Rossella; Nesi, Mascia; Nencini, Patrizia; Fargion, Aaron Thomas; Pratesi, Carlo; Dorigo, Walter
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1308550
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