Aims: Over the past years, interest in chrono-nutrition has grown enormously as the fundamental role of circadian rhythms in regulating most physiological and metabolic processes has become clearer. Recently, the influence of circadian rhythms on the gut microbiota (GM) composition has also emerged, as more than half of the total microbial composition fluctuates rhythmically throughout the day. At the same time, other studies have observed that the GM itself synchronises the host's circadian biological clock through signals of a different nature. Therefore, it has been hypothesised that there is a two-way communication between the circadian rhythms of the host and the GM, but researchers have only just begun to identify some of its action mechanisms. The manuscript aim is, therefore, to gather and combine the latest evidence in the field of chrono-nutrition with the more recent research on the GM, in order to investigate their relationship and their potential impact on human health. Data Synthesis: Considering current evidence, a desynchronization of circadian rhythms is closely associated with an alteration in the abundance and functionality of the gut microbiota with consequent deleterious effects on health, such as increased risk of numerous pathologies, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, irritable bowel disease, and depression. A key role in maintaining the balance between circadian rhythms and GM seems to be attributed to meal-timing and diet quality, as well as to certain microbial metabolites, in particular short-chain fatty acids. Conclusions: Future studies are needed to decipher the link between the circadian rhythms and specific microbial patterns in relation to different disease frameworks.

Circadian rhythms, gut microbiota, and diet: possible implications for health / Lotti, Sofia; Dinu, Monica; Colombini, Barbara; Amedei, Amedeo; Sofi, Francesco. - In: NMCD. NUTRITION METABOLISM AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES. - ISSN 0939-4753. - STAMPA. - 33:(2023), pp. 1490-1500. [10.1016/j.numecd.2023.05.009]

Circadian rhythms, gut microbiota, and diet: possible implications for health

Lotti, Sofia
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Dinu, Monica
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Colombini, Barbara
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Amedei, Amedeo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Sofi, Francesco
Writing – Review & Editing
2023

Abstract

Aims: Over the past years, interest in chrono-nutrition has grown enormously as the fundamental role of circadian rhythms in regulating most physiological and metabolic processes has become clearer. Recently, the influence of circadian rhythms on the gut microbiota (GM) composition has also emerged, as more than half of the total microbial composition fluctuates rhythmically throughout the day. At the same time, other studies have observed that the GM itself synchronises the host's circadian biological clock through signals of a different nature. Therefore, it has been hypothesised that there is a two-way communication between the circadian rhythms of the host and the GM, but researchers have only just begun to identify some of its action mechanisms. The manuscript aim is, therefore, to gather and combine the latest evidence in the field of chrono-nutrition with the more recent research on the GM, in order to investigate their relationship and their potential impact on human health. Data Synthesis: Considering current evidence, a desynchronization of circadian rhythms is closely associated with an alteration in the abundance and functionality of the gut microbiota with consequent deleterious effects on health, such as increased risk of numerous pathologies, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, irritable bowel disease, and depression. A key role in maintaining the balance between circadian rhythms and GM seems to be attributed to meal-timing and diet quality, as well as to certain microbial metabolites, in particular short-chain fatty acids. Conclusions: Future studies are needed to decipher the link between the circadian rhythms and specific microbial patterns in relation to different disease frameworks.
2023
33
1490
1500
Goal 3: Good health and well-being
Lotti, Sofia; Dinu, Monica; Colombini, Barbara; Amedei, Amedeo; Sofi, Francesco
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1311440
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