Background Automatic and continuous recording of vaginal temperature (TV) using wearable sensors causes mini- mal disruptions to animal behavior and can generate data that enable the evaluation of temporal body temperature variation under heat stress (HS) conditions. However, the genetic basis of TV in lactating sows from a longitudinal perspective is still unknown. The objectives of this study were to define statistical models and estimate genetic parameters for TV in lactating sows using random regression models, and identify genomic regions and candidate genes associated with HS indicators derived from automatically-recorded TV. Results Heritability estimates for TV ranged from 0.14 to 0.20 over time (throughout the day and measurement period) and from 0.09 to 0.18 along environmental gradients (EG, − 3.5 to 2.2, which correspond to dew point values from 14.87 to 28.19 ̊C). Repeatability estimates of TV over time and along EG ranged from 0.57 to 0.66 and from 0.54 to 0.77, respectively. TV measured from 12h00 to 16h00 had moderately high estimates of heritability (0.20) and repeatability (0.64), indicating that this period might be the most suitable for recording TV for genetic selection purposes. Significant genotype-by-environment interactions (GxE) were observed and the moderately high estimates of genetic correlations between pairs of extreme EG indicate potential re-ranking of selection candidates across EG. Two important genomic regions on chromosomes 10 (59.370–59.998 Mb) and16 (21.548–21.966 Mb) were identified. These regions harbor the genes CDC123, CAMK1d, SEC61A2, and NUDT5 that are associated with immunity, protein transport, and energy metabolism. Across the four time-periods, respectively 12, 13, 16, and 10 associated genomic regions across 14 chromosomes were identified for TV. For the three EG classes, respectively 18, 15, and 14 associated genomic windows were identified for TV, respectively. Each time-period and EG class had uniquely enriched genes with identified specific biological functions, including regulation of the nervous system, metabolism and hormone production. Conclusions TV is a heritable trait with substantial additive genetic variation and represents a promising indicator trait to select pigs for improved heat tolerance. Moderate GxE for TV exist, indicating potential re-ranking of selection candidates across EG. TV is a highly polygenic trait regulated by a complex interplay of physiological, cellular and behavioral mechanisms.

Longitudinal genomic analyses of automatically-recorded vaginal temperature in lactating sows under heat stress conditions based on random regression models / Hui Wen, Jay S. Johnson, Pedro H. F. Freitas, Jacob M. Maskal, Leonardo S. Gloria, Andre C. Araujo, Victor B. Pedrosa, Francesco Tiezzi, Christian Maltecca, Yijian Huang, Allan P. Schinckel, Luiz F. Brito. - In: GENETICS SELECTION EVOLUTION. - ISSN 1297-9686. - ELETTRONICO. - 55:(2023), pp. 95.1-95.19. [10.1186/s12711-023-00868-1]

Longitudinal genomic analyses of automatically-recorded vaginal temperature in lactating sows under heat stress conditions based on random regression models

Francesco Tiezzi;Christian Maltecca;
2023

Abstract

Background Automatic and continuous recording of vaginal temperature (TV) using wearable sensors causes mini- mal disruptions to animal behavior and can generate data that enable the evaluation of temporal body temperature variation under heat stress (HS) conditions. However, the genetic basis of TV in lactating sows from a longitudinal perspective is still unknown. The objectives of this study were to define statistical models and estimate genetic parameters for TV in lactating sows using random regression models, and identify genomic regions and candidate genes associated with HS indicators derived from automatically-recorded TV. Results Heritability estimates for TV ranged from 0.14 to 0.20 over time (throughout the day and measurement period) and from 0.09 to 0.18 along environmental gradients (EG, − 3.5 to 2.2, which correspond to dew point values from 14.87 to 28.19 ̊C). Repeatability estimates of TV over time and along EG ranged from 0.57 to 0.66 and from 0.54 to 0.77, respectively. TV measured from 12h00 to 16h00 had moderately high estimates of heritability (0.20) and repeatability (0.64), indicating that this period might be the most suitable for recording TV for genetic selection purposes. Significant genotype-by-environment interactions (GxE) were observed and the moderately high estimates of genetic correlations between pairs of extreme EG indicate potential re-ranking of selection candidates across EG. Two important genomic regions on chromosomes 10 (59.370–59.998 Mb) and16 (21.548–21.966 Mb) were identified. These regions harbor the genes CDC123, CAMK1d, SEC61A2, and NUDT5 that are associated with immunity, protein transport, and energy metabolism. Across the four time-periods, respectively 12, 13, 16, and 10 associated genomic regions across 14 chromosomes were identified for TV. For the three EG classes, respectively 18, 15, and 14 associated genomic windows were identified for TV, respectively. Each time-period and EG class had uniquely enriched genes with identified specific biological functions, including regulation of the nervous system, metabolism and hormone production. Conclusions TV is a heritable trait with substantial additive genetic variation and represents a promising indicator trait to select pigs for improved heat tolerance. Moderate GxE for TV exist, indicating potential re-ranking of selection candidates across EG. TV is a highly polygenic trait regulated by a complex interplay of physiological, cellular and behavioral mechanisms.
2023
55
1
19
Hui Wen, Jay S. Johnson, Pedro H. F. Freitas, Jacob M. Maskal, Leonardo S. Gloria, Andre C. Araujo, Victor B. Pedrosa, Francesco Tiezzi, Christian Maltecca, Yijian Huang, Allan P. Schinckel, Luiz F. Brito
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
wen2023gse.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Pdf editoriale (Version of record)
Licenza: Open Access
Dimensione 1.86 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.86 MB Adobe PDF

I documenti in FLORE sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1350020
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact