This study investigates individual differences in protective and risk factors among rescue workers (RWs), particularly Red Cross members, to optimize well-being and job performance under high-stress conditions. Employing a person-centered approach, two psychological profiles were identified: an adaptively resilient profile and a maladaptively vulnerable profile, characterized by distinct personality traits, coping methods, life events, and social support networks. A notable external criterion, self-compassion, discerned the profiles with maladaptively vulnerable individuals who exhibited higher self-judgment, social isolation, and emotional over-identification. The study also examined the impact of job roles on these profiles, discovering a prevalence of adaptive resilience among drivers, contrasting with team members who displayed maladaptive resilience and lower self-compassion scores. These insights suggest a nuanced method for identifying RWs who require specialized support, proposing tailored interventions, especially those enhancing self-compassion. The study, through an extensive psychological metric analysis, provides a deeper comprehension of resilience and vulnerability among RWs. This research highlights the importance of recognizing individual differences in protective and risk factors, thereby contributing to the enhancement of mental health and resilience in high-stress professions.

Individual Differences in Risk and Protective Factors: The Role of Self-Compassion Components among Emergency Responders / Colpizzi, Ilaria; Berti, Celeste; Sica, Claudio; Alfei, Virginia; Caudek, Corrado. - In: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES. - ISSN 2076-328X. - ELETTRONICO. - 14:(2024), pp. 0-0. [10.3390/bs14030178]

Individual Differences in Risk and Protective Factors: The Role of Self-Compassion Components among Emergency Responders

Colpizzi, Ilaria;Berti, Celeste;Sica, Claudio;Alfei, Virginia;Caudek, Corrado
2024

Abstract

This study investigates individual differences in protective and risk factors among rescue workers (RWs), particularly Red Cross members, to optimize well-being and job performance under high-stress conditions. Employing a person-centered approach, two psychological profiles were identified: an adaptively resilient profile and a maladaptively vulnerable profile, characterized by distinct personality traits, coping methods, life events, and social support networks. A notable external criterion, self-compassion, discerned the profiles with maladaptively vulnerable individuals who exhibited higher self-judgment, social isolation, and emotional over-identification. The study also examined the impact of job roles on these profiles, discovering a prevalence of adaptive resilience among drivers, contrasting with team members who displayed maladaptive resilience and lower self-compassion scores. These insights suggest a nuanced method for identifying RWs who require specialized support, proposing tailored interventions, especially those enhancing self-compassion. The study, through an extensive psychological metric analysis, provides a deeper comprehension of resilience and vulnerability among RWs. This research highlights the importance of recognizing individual differences in protective and risk factors, thereby contributing to the enhancement of mental health and resilience in high-stress professions.
2024
14
0
0
Colpizzi, Ilaria; Berti, Celeste; Sica, Claudio; Alfei, Virginia; Caudek, Corrado
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1352438
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