The first (Population III) stars formed only out of H and He and were likely more massive than present-day stars. Massive Population III stars in the range 140–260 Me are predicted to end their lives as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), enriching the environment with a unique abundance pattern, with high ratios of odd to even elements. Recently, the most promising candidate for a pure descendant of a zero-metallicity massive PISN (260 Me) was discovered by the LAMOST survey, the star J1010+2358. However, key elements to verify the high PISN contribution, C and Al, were missing from the analysis. To rectify this, we obtained and analyzed a high-resolution Very Large Telescope/UVES spectrum, correcting for 3D and/or non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. Our measurements of both C and Al give much higher values (∼1 dex) than expected from a 260 Me PISN. Furthermore, we find significant discrepancies with the previous analysis and therefore a much less pronounced odd–even pattern. Our results show that J1010+2358 cannot be a pure descendant of a 260 Me PISN. Instead, we find that the best-fit model consists of a 13Me PopulationII core-collapse supernova combined with a Population III supernova. Alternative, less favored solutions (c2 c2 » 2.3) include a 50% contribution from a best 260 Me PISN or a 40% contribution from a Population III Type Ia supernova. Ultimately, J1010+2358 is certainly a unique star giving insights into the earliest chemical enrichment; however, this star is not a pure PISN descendant.

On the Pair-instability Supernova Origin of J1010+2358* / Skúladóttir, Ása; Koutsouridou, Ioanna; Vanni, Irene; Amarsi, Anish M.; Lucchesi, Romain; Salvadori, Stefania; Aguado, David S.. - In: THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS. - ISSN 2041-8205. - STAMPA. - 968:(2024), pp. 1-10. [10.3847/2041-8213/ad4b1a]

On the Pair-instability Supernova Origin of J1010+2358*

Koutsouridou, Ioanna;Vanni, Irene;Lucchesi, Romain;Salvadori, Stefania;
2024

Abstract

The first (Population III) stars formed only out of H and He and were likely more massive than present-day stars. Massive Population III stars in the range 140–260 Me are predicted to end their lives as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), enriching the environment with a unique abundance pattern, with high ratios of odd to even elements. Recently, the most promising candidate for a pure descendant of a zero-metallicity massive PISN (260 Me) was discovered by the LAMOST survey, the star J1010+2358. However, key elements to verify the high PISN contribution, C and Al, were missing from the analysis. To rectify this, we obtained and analyzed a high-resolution Very Large Telescope/UVES spectrum, correcting for 3D and/or non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. Our measurements of both C and Al give much higher values (∼1 dex) than expected from a 260 Me PISN. Furthermore, we find significant discrepancies with the previous analysis and therefore a much less pronounced odd–even pattern. Our results show that J1010+2358 cannot be a pure descendant of a 260 Me PISN. Instead, we find that the best-fit model consists of a 13Me PopulationII core-collapse supernova combined with a Population III supernova. Alternative, less favored solutions (c2 c2 » 2.3) include a 50% contribution from a best 260 Me PISN or a 40% contribution from a Population III Type Ia supernova. Ultimately, J1010+2358 is certainly a unique star giving insights into the earliest chemical enrichment; however, this star is not a pure PISN descendant.
2024
968
1
10
Skúladóttir, Ása; Koutsouridou, Ioanna; Vanni, Irene; Amarsi, Anish M.; Lucchesi, Romain; Salvadori, Stefania; Aguado, David S....espandi
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1364154
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