The relation between anxiety, cognitive self-evaluation, performance, and electrical brain activity (event-related potentials, ERPs) in a sustained attention task (Go/NoGo; SART) was investigated in 18 participants. No significant correlation was found between reaction times and anxiety (assessed by State and Trait Anxiety Inventory or STAI), and cognitive self-evaluation (assessed by Cognitive Failures Questionnaire or CFQ). N2 (ERP time-window 250–350 ms) and P3 (350–650 ms) amplitudes were found to be related to anxiety and cognitive self-evaluation. N2 amplitude increased in trait and state high anxious participants, whereas P3 decreased in participants who reported a higher frequency of cognitive failures. Electrophysiological responses revealed that cognitive strategies were probably activated by more anxious and less self-confident individuals in order to be efficient in their performance. As shown by current research, frontal areas and anterior cingulated cortex appear to be particularly involved in this affective–cognitive interaction.

Anxiety, cognitive self-evaluation and performance: ERP correlates / S. Righi; L. Mecacci; M.P. Viggiano. - In: JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS. - ISSN 0887-6185. - STAMPA. - 23:(2009), pp. 1132-1138.

Anxiety, cognitive self-evaluation and performance: ERP correlates.

RIGHI, STEFANIA;MECACCI, LUCIANO;VIGGIANO, MARIA PIA
2009

Abstract

The relation between anxiety, cognitive self-evaluation, performance, and electrical brain activity (event-related potentials, ERPs) in a sustained attention task (Go/NoGo; SART) was investigated in 18 participants. No significant correlation was found between reaction times and anxiety (assessed by State and Trait Anxiety Inventory or STAI), and cognitive self-evaluation (assessed by Cognitive Failures Questionnaire or CFQ). N2 (ERP time-window 250–350 ms) and P3 (350–650 ms) amplitudes were found to be related to anxiety and cognitive self-evaluation. N2 amplitude increased in trait and state high anxious participants, whereas P3 decreased in participants who reported a higher frequency of cognitive failures. Electrophysiological responses revealed that cognitive strategies were probably activated by more anxious and less self-confident individuals in order to be efficient in their performance. As shown by current research, frontal areas and anterior cingulated cortex appear to be particularly involved in this affective–cognitive interaction.
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1138
S. Righi; L. Mecacci; M.P. Viggiano
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/366645
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