In Western Europe, as in the USA, mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has declined significantly in the last 30 years. Life expectancy for patients with coronary heart disease in the USA increased on average by 3 years between 1970 and 2000.1 Several epidemiological analyses support this positive evolution. An analysis of the underlying causes identifies improvements in quality of care and treatment as a major cause, accounting from 50 up to 75% of the success depending on the study samples, the remainder being accounted for by changes in lifestyle and prevention.2 Research and development in several areas of CVD have contributed to this success. In acute coronary events, the identification and development of efficient and safe thrombolytic agents followed by percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation were milestones in the reduction of acute mortality and salvage of myocardium.3–5 Statins have brought a major advance in preventing the progression of atherosclerotic disease and have been recognized for their wide mode of action.6 In heart failure (HF), beta-blockers and ACE-inhibitors have increased life expectancy by a leap.7 Some of these improvements have been the result of a classic bench-to-bedside development of a targeted treatment, such as the statins, others have known a more serendipitous development, such as beta-blockers.

Identifying needs and opportunities for advancing translational research in cardiovascular disease / KR.Sipido; A.Tedgui; SD.Kristensen; G.Pasterkamp; H.Schunkert; M.Wehling; PG.Steg; W.Eisert; F.Rademakers; B.Casadei; V.Fuster; E.Cerbai; G.Hasenfuss; F.Fernandez-Aviles; D.Garcia-Dorado; M.Vidal; M.Hallen; V.Dambrauskaite. - In: CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH. - ISSN 0008-6363. - STAMPA. - 83:(2009), pp. 425-435. [10.1093/cvr/cvp165]

Identifying needs and opportunities for advancing translational research in cardiovascular disease

CERBAI, ELISABETTA
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2009

Abstract

In Western Europe, as in the USA, mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has declined significantly in the last 30 years. Life expectancy for patients with coronary heart disease in the USA increased on average by 3 years between 1970 and 2000.1 Several epidemiological analyses support this positive evolution. An analysis of the underlying causes identifies improvements in quality of care and treatment as a major cause, accounting from 50 up to 75% of the success depending on the study samples, the remainder being accounted for by changes in lifestyle and prevention.2 Research and development in several areas of CVD have contributed to this success. In acute coronary events, the identification and development of efficient and safe thrombolytic agents followed by percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation were milestones in the reduction of acute mortality and salvage of myocardium.3–5 Statins have brought a major advance in preventing the progression of atherosclerotic disease and have been recognized for their wide mode of action.6 In heart failure (HF), beta-blockers and ACE-inhibitors have increased life expectancy by a leap.7 Some of these improvements have been the result of a classic bench-to-bedside development of a targeted treatment, such as the statins, others have known a more serendipitous development, such as beta-blockers.
83
425
435
KR.Sipido; A.Tedgui; SD.Kristensen; G.Pasterkamp; H.Schunkert; M.Wehling; PG.Steg; W.Eisert; F.Rademakers; B.Casadei; V.Fuster; E.Cerbai; G.Hasenfuss; F.Fernandez-Aviles; D.Garcia-Dorado; M.Vidal; M.Hallen; V.Dambrauskaite
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/370763
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