The relationship between preservation and transformation of old buildings is an ever-present aspect of all restorations, but in some cases it is particularly critical. In places where the situation has been compromised by demolition or even collapse, the conservation of the remaining parts, though often called fundamental, is often circumvented by the need (real or imagined) to adapt the existing parts to new requirements as foreseen by the project. The new construction can therefore lead to substantial demolition of parts of the ancient artefact, even if contrary to the declared intention of conservation. Both the St. Trinita Bridge in Florence and, about half a century later, the Stables of the Villa Medici of Poggio a Caiano near Florence were renovated, having suffered severe damage as a result of collapses. In the first case, the damage was certainly more devastating, having been caused by actions of war. In the second case, the damage affected limited parts of the structure and arose as a result of a long period of neglect. The interventions to the stables and to the bridge were also opportunities to introduce new functions. In fact, if we consider that the bridge had been built in the late sixteenth century to serve as a passage for wagons, we can see how it could withstand other stresses, and especially the force of floodwaters. The rebuilt bridge was tested with three vehicles whose total weight was nearly a hundred tons. In both interventions, the relationship between preliminary statements of principles and the design provides more than a hint of reflection on the problems posed by the preservation of tangible artefacts.

New additions and physical relation with the existing building / L.Giorgi; P.Matracchi. - STAMPA. - CONSERVATION/TRANSFORMATION(2011), pp. 289-308. ((Intervento presentato al convegno EAAE – ENHSA Network on Conservation Workshop tenutosi a Ireland nel 17-19 September 2009.

New additions and physical relation with the existing building

GIORGI, LUCA;MATRACCHI, PIETRO
2011

Abstract

The relationship between preservation and transformation of old buildings is an ever-present aspect of all restorations, but in some cases it is particularly critical. In places where the situation has been compromised by demolition or even collapse, the conservation of the remaining parts, though often called fundamental, is often circumvented by the need (real or imagined) to adapt the existing parts to new requirements as foreseen by the project. The new construction can therefore lead to substantial demolition of parts of the ancient artefact, even if contrary to the declared intention of conservation. Both the St. Trinita Bridge in Florence and, about half a century later, the Stables of the Villa Medici of Poggio a Caiano near Florence were renovated, having suffered severe damage as a result of collapses. In the first case, the damage was certainly more devastating, having been caused by actions of war. In the second case, the damage affected limited parts of the structure and arose as a result of a long period of neglect. The interventions to the stables and to the bridge were also opportunities to introduce new functions. In fact, if we consider that the bridge had been built in the late sixteenth century to serve as a passage for wagons, we can see how it could withstand other stresses, and especially the force of floodwaters. The rebuilt bridge was tested with three vehicles whose total weight was nearly a hundred tons. In both interventions, the relationship between preliminary statements of principles and the design provides more than a hint of reflection on the problems posed by the preservation of tangible artefacts.
Conservation/Transformation
EAAE – ENHSA Network on Conservation Workshop
Ireland
17-19 September 2009
L.Giorgi; P.Matracchi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2158/375234
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