Monumental stone decay is a consequence of the weathering action of physical, chemical and biological factors, which induce a progressive increase in porosity. To cope this degradation, bacterial calcium carbonate mineralization has been proposed as a tool for the conservation of monumental calcareous stones. The advantage of this kind of treatment is to obtain a mineral product similar to the stone substrate, mimicking the natural process responsible for stone formation. In this work, the possibility to induceCaCO3mineralization by a bacteria-mediated system in absence of viable cells was investigated and tested on stone. Our results showed that Bacillus subtilis dead cells as well as its bacterial cell wall fraction (BCF) can act as calcite crystallization nuclei in solution. BCF consolidating capability was further tested in laboratory on slab stones, and in situ on the Angera Church, a valuable 6th century monumental site. New crystals formation was observed inside pores and significant decrease in water absorption (up to 16.7%) in BCF treated samples. A little cohesion increase was observed in the treated area of the Angera Church, showing the potential of this application, even though further improvements are needed

A Bacillus subtilis cell fraction (BCF) inducing calcium carbonate precipitation: Biotechnological perspectives for monumental stone reinforcement / B. Perito; M. Marvasi; C. Barabesi; G. Mastromei; S. Bracci; M. Vendrell; P. Tiano. - In: JOURNAL OF CULTURAL HERITAGE. - ISSN 1296-2074. - STAMPA. - 15:(2014), pp. 345-351.

A Bacillus subtilis cell fraction (BCF) inducing calcium carbonate precipitation: Biotechnological perspectives for monumental stone reinforcement

PERITO, BRUNELLA;M. Marvasi;MASTROMEI, GIORGIO;
2014

Abstract

Monumental stone decay is a consequence of the weathering action of physical, chemical and biological factors, which induce a progressive increase in porosity. To cope this degradation, bacterial calcium carbonate mineralization has been proposed as a tool for the conservation of monumental calcareous stones. The advantage of this kind of treatment is to obtain a mineral product similar to the stone substrate, mimicking the natural process responsible for stone formation. In this work, the possibility to induceCaCO3mineralization by a bacteria-mediated system in absence of viable cells was investigated and tested on stone. Our results showed that Bacillus subtilis dead cells as well as its bacterial cell wall fraction (BCF) can act as calcite crystallization nuclei in solution. BCF consolidating capability was further tested in laboratory on slab stones, and in situ on the Angera Church, a valuable 6th century monumental site. New crystals formation was observed inside pores and significant decrease in water absorption (up to 16.7%) in BCF treated samples. A little cohesion increase was observed in the treated area of the Angera Church, showing the potential of this application, even though further improvements are needed
2014
15
345
351
B. Perito; M. Marvasi; C. Barabesi; G. Mastromei; S. Bracci; M. Vendrell; P. Tiano
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/884127
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