The quest to discover the variety of ecological niches inhabited by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has led to research in areas as diverse as wineries, oak trees, and insect guts. The discovery of fungal communities in the human gastrointestinal tract suggested the host's gut as a potential reservoir for yeast adaptation. Here we report the existence of yeast populations associated with the human gut (HG) that differ from those isolated from other human body sites. Phylogenetic analysis on 12 microsatellite loci and 1,715 combined CDSs from whole-genome sequencing revealed three subclusters of HG strains with further evidence of clonal colonization within the host's gut. The presence of such subclusters was supported by other genomic features, such as copy number variation, absence/introgressions of CDSs and relative polymorphism frequency. Functional analysis of CDSs specific of the different subclusters suggested possible alterations in cell wall composition and sporulation features. The phenotypic analysis combined with immunological profiling of these strains further showed that sporulation was related with strain-specific genomic characteristics in the immune recognition pattern. We conclude that both genetic and environmental factors involved in cell wall remodeling and sporulation are the main drivers of adaptation in S. cerevisiae populations in the human gut. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Population genomics reveals evolution and variation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the human and insects gut / Ramazzotti, Matteo; Stefanini, Irene; Di Paola, Monica; De Filippo, Carlotta; Rizzetto, Lisa; Berná, Luisa; Dapporto, Leonardo; Rivero, Damariz; Tocci, Noemi; Weil, Tobias; Lenucci, Marcello S; Lionetti, Paolo; Cavalieri, Duccio. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. - ISSN 1462-2912. - STAMPA. - (2018), pp. 1-22. [10.1111/1462-2920.14422]

Population genomics reveals evolution and variation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the human and insects gut

Ramazzotti, Matteo;Stefanini, Irene;Di Paola, Monica;De Filippo, Carlotta;Rizzetto, Lisa;Dapporto, Leonardo;Rivero, Damariz;Lionetti, Paolo;Cavalieri, Duccio
2018

Abstract

The quest to discover the variety of ecological niches inhabited by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has led to research in areas as diverse as wineries, oak trees, and insect guts. The discovery of fungal communities in the human gastrointestinal tract suggested the host's gut as a potential reservoir for yeast adaptation. Here we report the existence of yeast populations associated with the human gut (HG) that differ from those isolated from other human body sites. Phylogenetic analysis on 12 microsatellite loci and 1,715 combined CDSs from whole-genome sequencing revealed three subclusters of HG strains with further evidence of clonal colonization within the host's gut. The presence of such subclusters was supported by other genomic features, such as copy number variation, absence/introgressions of CDSs and relative polymorphism frequency. Functional analysis of CDSs specific of the different subclusters suggested possible alterations in cell wall composition and sporulation features. The phenotypic analysis combined with immunological profiling of these strains further showed that sporulation was related with strain-specific genomic characteristics in the immune recognition pattern. We conclude that both genetic and environmental factors involved in cell wall remodeling and sporulation are the main drivers of adaptation in S. cerevisiae populations in the human gut. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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Ramazzotti, Matteo; Stefanini, Irene; Di Paola, Monica; De Filippo, Carlotta; Rizzetto, Lisa; Berná, Luisa; Dapporto, Leonardo; Rivero, Damariz; Tocci, Noemi; Weil, Tobias; Lenucci, Marcello S; Lionetti, Paolo; Cavalieri, Duccio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1138686
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