Honeybee colonies are under the threat of many stressors, biotic and abiotic factors that strongly affect their survival. Recently, great attention has been directed at chemical pesticides, including their effects at sub-lethal doses on bee behaviour and colony success; whereas the potential side effects of natural biocides largely used in agriculture, such as entomopathogenic fungi, have received only marginal attention. Here, we report the impact of the fungus Beauveria bassiana on honeybee nestmate recognition ability, a crucial feature at the basis of colony integrity. We performed both behavioural assays by recording bee guards’ response towards foragers (nestmate or non-nestmate) either exposed to B. bassiana or unexposed presented at the hive entrance, and GC-MS analyses of the cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of fungus-exposed versus unexposed bees. Our results demonstrated that exposed bees have altered cuticular hydrocarbons and are more easily accepted into foreign colonies than controls. Since CHCs are the main recognition cues in social insects, changes in their composition appear to affect nestmate recognition ability at the colony level. The acceptance of chemically unrecognizable fungus-exposed foragers could therefore favour forager drift and disease spread across colonies.

Natural biocide disrupts nestmate recognition in honeybees / Cappa, Federico; Petrocelli, Iacopo; Dani, Francesca Romana; Dapporto, Leonardo; Giovannini, Michele; Silva-Castellari, Jeferson; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cervo, Rita. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - ELETTRONICO. - 9:(2019), pp. N/A-N/A. [10.1038/s41598-019-38963-3]

Natural biocide disrupts nestmate recognition in honeybees

Cappa, Federico;Petrocelli, Iacopo;Dani, Francesca Romana;Dapporto, Leonardo;GIOVANNINI, MICHELE;silva castellari, jeferson;Turillazzi, Stefano;Cervo, Rita
2019

Abstract

Honeybee colonies are under the threat of many stressors, biotic and abiotic factors that strongly affect their survival. Recently, great attention has been directed at chemical pesticides, including their effects at sub-lethal doses on bee behaviour and colony success; whereas the potential side effects of natural biocides largely used in agriculture, such as entomopathogenic fungi, have received only marginal attention. Here, we report the impact of the fungus Beauveria bassiana on honeybee nestmate recognition ability, a crucial feature at the basis of colony integrity. We performed both behavioural assays by recording bee guards’ response towards foragers (nestmate or non-nestmate) either exposed to B. bassiana or unexposed presented at the hive entrance, and GC-MS analyses of the cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of fungus-exposed versus unexposed bees. Our results demonstrated that exposed bees have altered cuticular hydrocarbons and are more easily accepted into foreign colonies than controls. Since CHCs are the main recognition cues in social insects, changes in their composition appear to affect nestmate recognition ability at the colony level. The acceptance of chemically unrecognizable fungus-exposed foragers could therefore favour forager drift and disease spread across colonies.
2019
9
N/A
N/A
Cappa, Federico; Petrocelli, Iacopo; Dani, Francesca Romana; Dapporto, Leonardo; Giovannini, Michele; Silva-Castellari, Jeferson; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cervo, Rita
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1152908
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