Psychological stress during adolescence may cause enduring cognitive deficits and anxiety in both humans and animals, accompanied by rearrangement of numerous brain structures and functions. A healthy diet is essential for proper brain development and maintenance of optimal cognitive functions during adulthood. Furthermore, nutritional components profoundly affect the intestinal community of microbes that may affect gut-brain communication. We adopted a relatively mild stress protocol, social instability stress, which when repeatedly administered to juvenile rats modifies cognitive behaviors and plasticity markers in the brain. We then tested the preventive effect of a prolonged diet enriched with the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and docosapentaenoic acid and vitamin A. Our findings highlight the beneficial effects of this enriched diet on cognitive memory impairment induced by social instability stress, as stressed rats fed the enriched diet exhibited performance undistinguishable from that of nonstressed rats on both emotional and reference memory tests. Furthermore, in stressed rats, the decline in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus and shifts in the microbiota composition were normalized by the enriched diet. The detrimental behavioral and neurochemical effects of adolescent stress, as well as the protective effect of the enriched diet, were maintained throughout adulthood, long after the exposure to the stressful environment was terminated. Taken together, our results strongly suggest a beneficial role of nutritional components in ameliorating stress-related behaviors and associated neurochemical and microbiota changes, opening possible new venues in the field of nutritional neuropsychopharmacology.

Preventing adolescent stress-induced cognitive and microbiome changes by diet / Gustavo Provensi, Scheila Daiane Schmidt, Marcus Boehme, Thomaz F. S. Bastiaanssen, Barbara Rani, Alessia Costa, Kizkitza Busca, Fiona Fouhy, Conall Strain, Catherine Stanton, Patrizio Blandina, Ivan Izquierdo, John F. Cryan, Maria Beatrice Passani. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - STAMPA. - 116:(2019), pp. 9644-9651. [10.1073/pnas.1820832116]

Preventing adolescent stress-induced cognitive and microbiome changes by diet

Gustavo Provensi
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Scheila Daiane Schmidt
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Barbara Rani
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Alessia Costa
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Patrizio Blandina
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Maria Beatrice Passani
Membro del Collaboration Group
2019

Abstract

Psychological stress during adolescence may cause enduring cognitive deficits and anxiety in both humans and animals, accompanied by rearrangement of numerous brain structures and functions. A healthy diet is essential for proper brain development and maintenance of optimal cognitive functions during adulthood. Furthermore, nutritional components profoundly affect the intestinal community of microbes that may affect gut-brain communication. We adopted a relatively mild stress protocol, social instability stress, which when repeatedly administered to juvenile rats modifies cognitive behaviors and plasticity markers in the brain. We then tested the preventive effect of a prolonged diet enriched with the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and docosapentaenoic acid and vitamin A. Our findings highlight the beneficial effects of this enriched diet on cognitive memory impairment induced by social instability stress, as stressed rats fed the enriched diet exhibited performance undistinguishable from that of nonstressed rats on both emotional and reference memory tests. Furthermore, in stressed rats, the decline in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus and shifts in the microbiota composition were normalized by the enriched diet. The detrimental behavioral and neurochemical effects of adolescent stress, as well as the protective effect of the enriched diet, were maintained throughout adulthood, long after the exposure to the stressful environment was terminated. Taken together, our results strongly suggest a beneficial role of nutritional components in ameliorating stress-related behaviors and associated neurochemical and microbiota changes, opening possible new venues in the field of nutritional neuropsychopharmacology.
2019
116
9644
9651
Goal 3: Good health and well-being for people
Gustavo Provensi, Scheila Daiane Schmidt, Marcus Boehme, Thomaz F. S. Bastiaanssen, Barbara Rani, Alessia Costa, Kizkitza Busca, Fiona Fouhy, Conall Strain, Catherine Stanton, Patrizio Blandina, Ivan Izquierdo, John F. Cryan, Maria Beatrice Passani
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1154668
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