(1) Background: The aim of this study is to establish which specific elements of the built environment can contribute to improving the physical activity of self-sufficient, noninstitutionalized and living in the city adults > 65 years. (2) Methods: An extensive literature search was conducted in several database. Umbrella review methodology was used to include the reviews that presented a sufficient methodological quality. (3) Results: Eleven reviews were included. The elements positively associated with physical activity in older adults were: walkability; residential density/urbanization; street connectivity; land-use mix-destination diversity; overall access to facilities, destinations and services; pedestrian-friendly infrastructures; greenery and aesthetically pleasing scenery; high environmental quality; street lighting; crime-related safety; traffic-related safety. The elements that were negatively associated with physical activity were: poor pedestrian access to shopping centers; poor pedestrian-friendly infrastructure and footpath quality; barriers to walking/cycling; lack of aesthetically pleasing scenery; crime-related unsafety; unattended dogs; inadequate street lighting and upkeep; traffic; littering, vandalism, decay; pollution; noise. (4) Conclusions: Evidence shows that specific elements of the built environment can contribute to promoting older people’s physical activity. The city restructuring plans should take into consideration these factors.

Impact of the built environment and the neighborhood in promoting the physical activity and the healthy aging in older people: An umbrella review / Bonaccorsi G.; Manzi F.; Del Riccio M.; Setola N.; Naldi E.; Milani C.; Giorgetti D.; Dellisanti C.; Lorini C.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1660-4601. - STAMPA. - 17:(2020), pp. 1-27. [10.3390/ijerph17176127]

Impact of the built environment and the neighborhood in promoting the physical activity and the healthy aging in older people: An umbrella review

Bonaccorsi G.;Manzi F.
;
Del Riccio M.;Setola N.;Naldi E.;Milani C.;Giorgetti D.;Dellisanti C.;Lorini C.
2020

Abstract

(1) Background: The aim of this study is to establish which specific elements of the built environment can contribute to improving the physical activity of self-sufficient, noninstitutionalized and living in the city adults > 65 years. (2) Methods: An extensive literature search was conducted in several database. Umbrella review methodology was used to include the reviews that presented a sufficient methodological quality. (3) Results: Eleven reviews were included. The elements positively associated with physical activity in older adults were: walkability; residential density/urbanization; street connectivity; land-use mix-destination diversity; overall access to facilities, destinations and services; pedestrian-friendly infrastructures; greenery and aesthetically pleasing scenery; high environmental quality; street lighting; crime-related safety; traffic-related safety. The elements that were negatively associated with physical activity were: poor pedestrian access to shopping centers; poor pedestrian-friendly infrastructure and footpath quality; barriers to walking/cycling; lack of aesthetically pleasing scenery; crime-related unsafety; unattended dogs; inadequate street lighting and upkeep; traffic; littering, vandalism, decay; pollution; noise. (4) Conclusions: Evidence shows that specific elements of the built environment can contribute to promoting older people’s physical activity. The city restructuring plans should take into consideration these factors.
2020
17
1
27
Goal 11: Sustainable cities and communities
Bonaccorsi G.; Manzi F.; Del Riccio M.; Setola N.; Naldi E.; Milani C.; Giorgetti D.; Dellisanti C.; Lorini C.
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1204572
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