Abstract Objective. The present study aimed to examine the protective role of perceived mattering to family and friends on psychological well-being in the Italian context during the COVID-19 pandemic, considering the mediating role of emotion regulation. Design. Data were collected during the first lockdown (March-April, 2020; time 1) and in other two moments (August and November, 2020; times 2 and 3). Cross-sectional analyses were conducted considering participants who completed the first wave (N=457), while longitudinal analyses were performed on participants who completed the three waves (N=109). Main outcome measures. Participants were administered the Mattering to Others Questionnaire, the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and a short form of the Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being Scale. Results. Results of correlational analyses supported the hypothesised link between perceived mattering and psychological well-being, which was mediated by difficulties in emotion regulations. Results of multilevel SEMs showed that individuals who experienced more mattering to family than others across a 9 months period, reported also lower levels of difficulties in emotion regulation and higher psychological well-being than others. Conclusion. Our findings clearly show that the perception of being important for family and friends could favour emotion regulation, thus protecting individuals from the negative psychological consequences of social isolation.

Perceived mattering in the face of COVID-19: links with emotion regulation and psychological well-being / CAMILLA MATERA, MONICA PARADISI, JESSICA BOIN, AMANDA NERINI. - In: PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH. - ISSN 0887-0446. - STAMPA. - (2021), pp. 0-10. [10.1080/08870446.2021.2002860]

Perceived mattering in the face of COVID-19: links with emotion regulation and psychological well-being

CAMILLA MATERA
;
MONICA PARADISI;JESSICA BOIN;AMANDA NERINI
2021

Abstract

Abstract Objective. The present study aimed to examine the protective role of perceived mattering to family and friends on psychological well-being in the Italian context during the COVID-19 pandemic, considering the mediating role of emotion regulation. Design. Data were collected during the first lockdown (March-April, 2020; time 1) and in other two moments (August and November, 2020; times 2 and 3). Cross-sectional analyses were conducted considering participants who completed the first wave (N=457), while longitudinal analyses were performed on participants who completed the three waves (N=109). Main outcome measures. Participants were administered the Mattering to Others Questionnaire, the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and a short form of the Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being Scale. Results. Results of correlational analyses supported the hypothesised link between perceived mattering and psychological well-being, which was mediated by difficulties in emotion regulations. Results of multilevel SEMs showed that individuals who experienced more mattering to family than others across a 9 months period, reported also lower levels of difficulties in emotion regulation and higher psychological well-being than others. Conclusion. Our findings clearly show that the perception of being important for family and friends could favour emotion regulation, thus protecting individuals from the negative psychological consequences of social isolation.
2021
0
10
Goal 3: Good health and well-being for people
CAMILLA MATERA, MONICA PARADISI, JESSICA BOIN, AMANDA NERINI
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1247783
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