Background & aims: The effect of the COVID-19 infection on nutritional status is not well established. Worldwide epidemiological studies have begun to investigate the incidence of malnutrition during hospitalization for COVID-19. The prevalence of malnutrition during follow-up after COVID-19 infection has not been investigated yet. The primary objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of the risk of malnutrition in hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19, re-evaluating their nutritional status during follow-up after discharge. The secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to the onset of malnutrition during hospitalization and after discharge. Methods: We enrolled 142 COVID-19 patients admitted to Careggi University Hospital. Nutritional parameters were measured at three different timepoints for each patient: upon admission to hospital, at discharge from hospital and 3 months after discharge during follow-up. The prevalence of both the nutritional risk and malnutrition was assessed. During the follow-up, the presence of nutritional impact symptoms (NIS) was also investigated. An analysis of the association between demographic and clinical features and nutritional status was conducted. Results: The mean unintended weight loss during hospitalization was 7.6% (p < 0.001). A positive correlation between age and weight loss during hospitalization was observed (r = 0.146, p = 0.08). Moreover, for elderly patients (>61 years old), a statistically significant correlation between age and weight loss was found (r = 0.288 p = 0.05). Patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Intermediate Care Unit (IMCU) had a greater unintended weight loss than patients who stayed in a standard care ward (5.46% vs 1.19%; p < 0.001). At discharge 12 patients were malnourished (8.4%) according to the ESPEN definition. On average, patients gained 4.36 kg (p < 0.001) three months after discharge. Overall, we observed a weight reduction of 2.2% (p < 0.001) from the habitual weight measured upon admission. Patients admitted to an ICU/IMCU showed a higher MUST score three months after discharge (Cramer's V 0.218, p = 0.035). With regard to the NIS score, only 7 patients (4.9%) reported one or more nutritional problems during follow-up. Conclusions: The identification of groups of patients at a higher nutritional risk could be useful with a view to adopting measures to prevent worsening of nutritional status during hospitalization. Admission to an ICU/IMCU, age and length of the hospital stay seem to have a major impact on nutritional status. Nutritional follow-up should be guaranteed for patients who lose more than 10% of their habitual weight during their stay in hospital, especially after admission to an ICU/IMCU.

Prevalence of nutritional risk and malnutrition during and after hospitalization for COVID-19 infection: Preliminary results of a single-centre experience / C Fiorindi , F Campani , L Rasero , C Campani , L Livi , L Giovannoni , C Amato , F Giudici , A Bartoloni , F Fattirolli , F Lavorini , I Olivotto , A Nannoni. - In: CLINICAL NUTRITION ESPEN. - ISSN 2405-4577. - STAMPA. - 42:(2021), pp. 351-355.

Prevalence of nutritional risk and malnutrition during and after hospitalization for COVID-19 infection: Preliminary results of a single-centre experience

C Fiorindi
;
L Rasero
Supervision
;
C Campani
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
L Giovannoni
Investigation
;
C Amato
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
F Giudici
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
A Bartoloni
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
F Fattirolli
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
F Lavorini;I Olivotto;
2021

Abstract

Background & aims: The effect of the COVID-19 infection on nutritional status is not well established. Worldwide epidemiological studies have begun to investigate the incidence of malnutrition during hospitalization for COVID-19. The prevalence of malnutrition during follow-up after COVID-19 infection has not been investigated yet. The primary objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of the risk of malnutrition in hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19, re-evaluating their nutritional status during follow-up after discharge. The secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to the onset of malnutrition during hospitalization and after discharge. Methods: We enrolled 142 COVID-19 patients admitted to Careggi University Hospital. Nutritional parameters were measured at three different timepoints for each patient: upon admission to hospital, at discharge from hospital and 3 months after discharge during follow-up. The prevalence of both the nutritional risk and malnutrition was assessed. During the follow-up, the presence of nutritional impact symptoms (NIS) was also investigated. An analysis of the association between demographic and clinical features and nutritional status was conducted. Results: The mean unintended weight loss during hospitalization was 7.6% (p < 0.001). A positive correlation between age and weight loss during hospitalization was observed (r = 0.146, p = 0.08). Moreover, for elderly patients (>61 years old), a statistically significant correlation between age and weight loss was found (r = 0.288 p = 0.05). Patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Intermediate Care Unit (IMCU) had a greater unintended weight loss than patients who stayed in a standard care ward (5.46% vs 1.19%; p < 0.001). At discharge 12 patients were malnourished (8.4%) according to the ESPEN definition. On average, patients gained 4.36 kg (p < 0.001) three months after discharge. Overall, we observed a weight reduction of 2.2% (p < 0.001) from the habitual weight measured upon admission. Patients admitted to an ICU/IMCU showed a higher MUST score three months after discharge (Cramer's V 0.218, p = 0.035). With regard to the NIS score, only 7 patients (4.9%) reported one or more nutritional problems during follow-up. Conclusions: The identification of groups of patients at a higher nutritional risk could be useful with a view to adopting measures to prevent worsening of nutritional status during hospitalization. Admission to an ICU/IMCU, age and length of the hospital stay seem to have a major impact on nutritional status. Nutritional follow-up should be guaranteed for patients who lose more than 10% of their habitual weight during their stay in hospital, especially after admission to an ICU/IMCU.
2021
42
351
355
C Fiorindi , F Campani , L Rasero , C Campani , L Livi , L Giovannoni , C Amato , F Giudici , A Bartoloni , F Fattirolli , F Lavorini , I Olivotto , A Nannoni
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Utilizza questo identificatore per citare o creare un link a questa risorsa: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1258083
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