Thrombosis is a common disorder with a relevant burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly among elderly patients. Growing evidence demonstrated a direct role of oxidative stress in thrombosis, with various cell types contributing to this process. Among them, erythrocytes produce high quantities of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase activation and haemoglobin autoxidation. Concomitantly, extracellular ROS released by other cells in the blood flow can be uptaken and accumulate within erythrocytes. This oxidative milieu can alter erythrocyte membrane structure, leading to an impaired erythrocyte function, and promoting erythrocytes lysis, binding to endothelial cells, activation of platelet and of coagulation factors, phosphatidylserine exposure and release of microvesicles. Moreover, these abnormal erythrocytes are able to adhere to the vessel wall, contributing to thrombin generation within the thrombus. This process results in accelerated haemolysis and in a hypercoagulable state, in which structurally impaired erythrocytes contribute to increase thrombus size, to reduce its permeability and susceptibility to lysis. However, the wide plethora of mechanisms by which oxidised erythrocytes contribute to thrombosis is not completely elucidated. This review discusses the main biochemical aspects linking erythrocytes, oxidative stress and thrombosis, addressing their potential implication for clinical and therapeutic management.

Erythrocyte oxidative stress and thrombosis / Bettiol, Alessandra; Galora, Silvia; Argento, Flavia Rita; Fini, Eleonora; Emmi, Giacomo; Mattioli, Irene; Bagni, Giacomo; Fiorillo, Claudia; Becatti, Matteo. - In: EXPERT REVIEWS IN MOLECULAR MEDICINE. - ISSN 1462-3994. - ELETTRONICO. - 24:(2022), pp. 1-1. [10.1017/erm.2022.25]

Erythrocyte oxidative stress and thrombosis

Bettiol, Alessandra;Galora, Silvia;Argento, Flavia Rita;Fini, Eleonora;Emmi, Giacomo;Mattioli, Irene;Bagni, Giacomo;Fiorillo, Claudia;Becatti, Matteo
2022

Abstract

Thrombosis is a common disorder with a relevant burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly among elderly patients. Growing evidence demonstrated a direct role of oxidative stress in thrombosis, with various cell types contributing to this process. Among them, erythrocytes produce high quantities of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase activation and haemoglobin autoxidation. Concomitantly, extracellular ROS released by other cells in the blood flow can be uptaken and accumulate within erythrocytes. This oxidative milieu can alter erythrocyte membrane structure, leading to an impaired erythrocyte function, and promoting erythrocytes lysis, binding to endothelial cells, activation of platelet and of coagulation factors, phosphatidylserine exposure and release of microvesicles. Moreover, these abnormal erythrocytes are able to adhere to the vessel wall, contributing to thrombin generation within the thrombus. This process results in accelerated haemolysis and in a hypercoagulable state, in which structurally impaired erythrocytes contribute to increase thrombus size, to reduce its permeability and susceptibility to lysis. However, the wide plethora of mechanisms by which oxidised erythrocytes contribute to thrombosis is not completely elucidated. This review discusses the main biochemical aspects linking erythrocytes, oxidative stress and thrombosis, addressing their potential implication for clinical and therapeutic management.
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Bettiol, Alessandra; Galora, Silvia; Argento, Flavia Rita; Fini, Eleonora; Emmi, Giacomo; Mattioli, Irene; Bagni, Giacomo; Fiorillo, Claudia; Becatti, Matteo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1285839
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