Peyronie's disease (PD), a fibrotic disorder of the tunica albuginea fully described in 1793 by French physician Francois de la Peyronie, is characterized by pain, plaque formation, penile deformity, and ultimately sexual function decline. The epidemiological data on PD vary considerably across previous studies, with recent evidence reporting a prevalence of up to 9%. PD is generally divided into two different phases: active or acute and stable or chronic. Plaque formation generally occurs during the acute phase, while during chronic phase pain usually tends to complete resolution and penile deformity stabilizes. PD's pathophysiology is still subject of great discussion. Tunical mechanical stress and microvascular trauma are major contributory factors. However, better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this condition remains paramount towards an in-depth comprehension of the disorder and the development of newer and more effective disease-targeted interventions. In this review we provide a detailed overview of natural history of PD, specifically focusing on clinical manifestations and the underlying molecular regulation patterns.

The Natural History of Peyronie's Disease / Di Maida, Fabrizio; Cito, Gianmartin; Lambertini, Luca; Valastro, Francesca; Morelli, Girolamo; Mari, Andrea; Carini, Marco; Minervini, Andrea; Cocci, Andrea. - In: THE WORLD JOURNAL OF MEN'S HEALTH. - ISSN 2287-4208. - ELETTRONICO. - 39:(2021), pp. 399-405. [10.5534/wjmh.200065]

The Natural History of Peyronie's Disease

Di Maida, Fabrizio;Cito, Gianmartin;Lambertini, Luca;Valastro, Francesca;Mari, Andrea;Carini, Marco;Minervini, Andrea;Cocci, Andrea
2021

Abstract

Peyronie's disease (PD), a fibrotic disorder of the tunica albuginea fully described in 1793 by French physician Francois de la Peyronie, is characterized by pain, plaque formation, penile deformity, and ultimately sexual function decline. The epidemiological data on PD vary considerably across previous studies, with recent evidence reporting a prevalence of up to 9%. PD is generally divided into two different phases: active or acute and stable or chronic. Plaque formation generally occurs during the acute phase, while during chronic phase pain usually tends to complete resolution and penile deformity stabilizes. PD's pathophysiology is still subject of great discussion. Tunical mechanical stress and microvascular trauma are major contributory factors. However, better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this condition remains paramount towards an in-depth comprehension of the disorder and the development of newer and more effective disease-targeted interventions. In this review we provide a detailed overview of natural history of PD, specifically focusing on clinical manifestations and the underlying molecular regulation patterns.
39
399
405
Di Maida, Fabrizio; Cito, Gianmartin; Lambertini, Luca; Valastro, Francesca; Morelli, Girolamo; Mari, Andrea; Carini, Marco; Minervini, Andrea; Cocci, Andrea
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
wjmh-39-399.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: full text
Tipologia: Pdf editoriale (Version of record)
Licenza: Open Access
Dimensione 509.53 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
509.53 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in FLORE sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1287276
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact