Conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) investigations are limited to detect only the axial component of the blood velocity vector. A novel dual-beam method has been recently proposed in which the Doppler angle is estimated through a reference US beam, and the velocity magnitude through a measuring US beam, respectively. In this study, the performance of such a method has been assessed quantitatively through in vitro and in vivo measurements made in different experimental conditions. In vitro, more than 300 acquisitions were completed using seven transducers to insonify a straight tube phantom at different Doppler angles. In steady laminar flow conditions, the velocity magnitude was measured with mean error of –1.9% (95% confidence interval: –2.33% to –1.47%) and standard deviation of 3.4%, with respect to a reference velocity. In pulsatile flow conditions, reproducibility tests of the entire velocity waveforms provided an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 6.9%. For peak velocity measurements made at five Doppler angles and three flow rates, the intrasession and intersession CVs were in the range 0.8–3.7% and 2.9–10.6%, respectively. The peak systolic velocities (PSVs) in the common carotid arteries of 21 volunteers were estimated with 95% limits of agreement of ± 9.6 cm/s (intersession). This analysis shows that the proposed dual-beam method is capable of overcoming the Doppler angle ambiguity by producing reliable velocity measurements over a large set of experimental conditions.

Accuracy and Reproducibility of a Novel Dual-Beam Vector Doppler Method / S.Ricci; S.Diciotti; L.Francalanci; P.Tortoli. - In: ULTRASOUND IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0301-5629. - STAMPA. - 35:(2009), pp. 829-838. [10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2008.10.012]

Accuracy and Reproducibility of a Novel Dual-Beam Vector Doppler Method

RICCI, STEFANO;DICIOTTI, STEFANO;FRANCALANCI, LORENZO;TORTOLI, PIERO
2009

Abstract

Conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) investigations are limited to detect only the axial component of the blood velocity vector. A novel dual-beam method has been recently proposed in which the Doppler angle is estimated through a reference US beam, and the velocity magnitude through a measuring US beam, respectively. In this study, the performance of such a method has been assessed quantitatively through in vitro and in vivo measurements made in different experimental conditions. In vitro, more than 300 acquisitions were completed using seven transducers to insonify a straight tube phantom at different Doppler angles. In steady laminar flow conditions, the velocity magnitude was measured with mean error of –1.9% (95% confidence interval: –2.33% to –1.47%) and standard deviation of 3.4%, with respect to a reference velocity. In pulsatile flow conditions, reproducibility tests of the entire velocity waveforms provided an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 6.9%. For peak velocity measurements made at five Doppler angles and three flow rates, the intrasession and intersession CVs were in the range 0.8–3.7% and 2.9–10.6%, respectively. The peak systolic velocities (PSVs) in the common carotid arteries of 21 volunteers were estimated with 95% limits of agreement of ± 9.6 cm/s (intersession). This analysis shows that the proposed dual-beam method is capable of overcoming the Doppler angle ambiguity by producing reliable velocity measurements over a large set of experimental conditions.
35
829
838
S.Ricci; S.Diciotti; L.Francalanci; P.Tortoli
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/323006
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