For many adolescents, the COVID-19 pandemic represents a uniquely challenging period, and concerns have been raised about whether COVID-19-related stress may increase the risk for self-injurious behaviors among adolescents. This study examined the impact of pre-existing vulnerabilities on the occurrence and frequency of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) through COVID-19-related stress, and whether the impact of COVID-19-related stress on NSSI was buffered by the perceived social support during the pandemic. Participants were 1061 adolescents (52.40% females; M-age = 15.49 years, SD = 0.76) from a two-wave longitudinal study, which included assessments before the COVID-19 onset and one year later the declaration of the pandemic. Path analyses showed that adolescents with a prior history of NSSI, higher levels of internalizing symptoms, and poor regulatory emotional self-efficacy before the COVID-19 pandemic reported higher levels of COVID-19-related stress which in turn increased their risk to engage in NSSI. Besides, the findings did not support the role of social support as a moderator of the association between COVID-19 related stress and the occurrence/frequency of NSSI. These findings suggest that enhanced stress perception may serve as a key pathway for the continuation and development of NSSI among vulnerable adolescents facing adverse life events.

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescence: The Role of Pre-Existing Vulnerabilities and COVID-19-Related Stress / De Luca, Lisa; Giletta, Matteo; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia. - In: JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE. - ISSN 0047-2891. - STAMPA. - 51:(2022), pp. 2383-2395. [10.1007/s10964-022-01669-3]

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescence: The Role of Pre-Existing Vulnerabilities and COVID-19-Related Stress

De Luca, Lisa
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Giletta, Matteo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Nocentini, Annalaura
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Menesini, Ersilia
Writing – Review & Editing
2022

Abstract

For many adolescents, the COVID-19 pandemic represents a uniquely challenging period, and concerns have been raised about whether COVID-19-related stress may increase the risk for self-injurious behaviors among adolescents. This study examined the impact of pre-existing vulnerabilities on the occurrence and frequency of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) through COVID-19-related stress, and whether the impact of COVID-19-related stress on NSSI was buffered by the perceived social support during the pandemic. Participants were 1061 adolescents (52.40% females; M-age = 15.49 years, SD = 0.76) from a two-wave longitudinal study, which included assessments before the COVID-19 onset and one year later the declaration of the pandemic. Path analyses showed that adolescents with a prior history of NSSI, higher levels of internalizing symptoms, and poor regulatory emotional self-efficacy before the COVID-19 pandemic reported higher levels of COVID-19-related stress which in turn increased their risk to engage in NSSI. Besides, the findings did not support the role of social support as a moderator of the association between COVID-19 related stress and the occurrence/frequency of NSSI. These findings suggest that enhanced stress perception may serve as a key pathway for the continuation and development of NSSI among vulnerable adolescents facing adverse life events.
51
2383
2395
Goal 3: Good health and well-being
De Luca, Lisa; Giletta, Matteo; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2158/1287627
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